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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello all,

Hope riding is going well for everyone. Would anyone know if there is a good winter storage stand for the Rebel. I've been reading that we're supposed to keep the bikes off the ground for the winter and I was wondering if people had good recommendations for me, something that I can buy online preferably for winter storage in Canada.

P.S. It does get cold here but please don't let this post confirm your misconceptions that we live in Igloos up here. We have moved on to bricks. Thanks
 

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Hello all,

Hope riding is going well for everyone. Would anyone know if there is a good winter storage stand for the Rebel. I've been reading that we're supposed to keep the bikes off the ground for the winter and I was wondering if people had good recommendations for me, something that I can buy online preferably for winter storage in Canada.

P.S. It does get cold here but please don't let this post confirm your misconceptions that we live in Igloos up here. Thanks (in case you have them)
I read that there isn't any that is for the new rebel, but I also have read that people have used their car jacks to keep it of the ground. I am not sure how stable that is thought.
 

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I use my standard motorcycle jack for storage. Jack the bike up till it barely clears the floor, and lock the safety catch so the hydraulics won't leak down. Then I can roll it around the garage and put it anywhere I want, or move it anytime I need to. Keeps the pressure off the tires so they don't develop flat spots. Only problem is that I have 3 bikes and only 1 jack.
 

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I use my standard motorcycle jack for storage. Jack the bike up till it barely clears the floor, and lock the safety catch so the hydraulics won't leak down. Then I can roll it around the garage and put it anywhere I want, or move it anytime I need to. Keeps the pressure off the tires so they don't develop flat spots. Only problem is that I have 3 bikes and only 1 jack.
You're talking about a senter jack, so that you lift the bike in one go? Or..?
 

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I plan on continuing to ride throughout the winter, as long as the roads are clear.

65-70 mpg on the bike vs 20 mpg in my truck, and I have around a 50 mile round trip for work each day.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N920A using Tapatalk
Likewise, unless there's rain or snow I plan on riding (45 mile round trip).
 

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I plan on continuing to ride throughout the winter, as long as the roads are clear.

65-70 mpg on the bike vs 20 mpg in my truck, and I have around a 50 mile round trip for work each day.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N920A using Tapatalk
Sure, why not? If the roads are good, then just dress for the weather.
 

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You're talking about a senter jack, so that you lift the bike in one go? Or..?
Not really sure what you call it. I always just called it a motorcycle/ATV lift. It has four wheels, two of which are swivel casters. It has two horizontal arms that go under the bike frame between the wheels, along with connecting linkages that keep them horizontal as they are lifted by a hydraulic jack that is foot pedal operated. It has a removable handle that allows you to pull or push it around wherever you want it after you lift the bike.

Some bikes like the Rebel 250 require blocks between the bike frame and the jack arms to prevent lifting on the exhaust pipes or mufflers. Others like my Harley's which have the frame below the exhaust just sit directly on the arms. The arms have a rubber pad so the bike won't slip. There are loops provided on the arms, and I usually use ratchet straps on each side to attach the bike securely to the arms. This allows you to work on the bike, pull wrenches, push on it, sit on it, etc. without worrying about it falling off the jack or tipping over. It is not completely necessary as the bike usually balances and sits on it pretty solidly, but it is just a safety measure for a little more confidence. With it strapped on, it would be hard to tip it over if you and a buddy tried.

I use it for oil changes, tire work, chain service, winter storage, or anytime I want the bike lifted or stabilized to make it easier to work on. It will raise the bike about 18" if needed, or just barely clear the floor, or just decompress the suspension, or anywhere in between, depending on what you are doing to it.
 

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Not really sure what you call it. I always just called it a motorcycle/ATV lift. It has four wheels, two of which are swivel casters. It has two horizontal arms that go under the bike frame between the wheels, along with connecting linkages that keep them horizontal as they are lifted by a hydraulic jack that is foot pedal operated. It has a removable handle that allows you to pull or push it around wherever you want it after you lift the bike.
Ok you seriously need to get some pictures taken of that! And if possible, where you got it?
Sounds like a wonderful and neat tool to make things waaay easier. I want it! :grin2:
 

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I am not sure that the Harbor Freight Lift is the best choice to lift a bike that the engine is a component of the frame.

If you can ask the dealer where you purchased your Rebel how to lift the bike.

Kenny G
 

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I am not sure that the Harbor Freight Lift is the best choice to lift a bike that the engine is a component of the frame.

If you can ask the dealer where you purchased your Rebel how to lift the bike.

Kenny G

I was wondering the same thing, I have one of those jacks but I am unsure where it would be safe to lift it at. I had a look under the bike and nothing stands out.
 

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Regarding the safety catch, it is basically a mechanical lock with notches at different heights so that after you lift it with the hydraulic jack, you can let it back down slightly on the lock to release the pressure on the hydraulics or prevent it from leaking down if the hydraulics fail.

These jacks work just fine on the Rebel, but require blocks between the bike frame and the jack to prevent lifting on the exhaust system. I use short wooden 2X4 and/or 4X4 blocks on top of the jack arms and under the frame. Pretty simple and easy to use.

I also strap the bike to the jack arms with a couple of ratchet straps, one on each side of the bike over the foot pegs and under the jack arms. You can then push, pull, wrench, etc. without worrying about it falling over.
 

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Editing rules suck on this site.

The above post is for the Rebel 250.

I have not looked at the new NOT Rebel 300 or 500 to see if it will fit directly on the jack like the Harleys, or require blocks like the Rebel 250, or require some other type of adapters to fit. I am sure that it can be made to fit with a little ingenuity, adaptation, or modification.
 

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Paw,

There is no frame under the engine on the new 2107 CMX Rebel 300 or 500. The engine is actually a component of the frame and Honda says not to lift the new Rebel by the engine.

Kenny G
 
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