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Discussion Starter #1
:eek: It'll soon be time to think about winter maintenance (well, here in Montana anyway). Obviously, the 2017 Rebels are brand new but the principles are the same as for other bikes, I'm sure. Does anyone have any tips to share, other than what's in the owner's manual? Do you typically remove the battery and "hibernate" the machine until spring, or do you keep it on standby in case there are days that are still dry and warm enough?
 

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I don't understand.

Isn't your lounge room heated 24/7?
:wink2:





Sorry for the bad joke. Even in the Southern section of this continent, putting a bike away for winter is unheard of.
I'm sure that some of our members in colder climates can help though.

Cheers

Jim
 

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I'm wondering the same thing and will be doing some research on it today. Things like:

Just disconnect the battery or put it on a charger?
Do I have to have both wheels off the ground or can I just have them on rubber mats?
Drain the gas or just ad a fuel stabilizer?
Should I start it every so often and how often?
Do I have to cover it?
Etc...

Essentially it'll be stored between October/November to April/May.
 

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I'm wondering the same thing and will be doing some research on it today. Things like:

Just disconnect the battery or put it on a charger?
Do I have to have both wheels off the ground or can I just have them on rubber mats?
Drain the gas or just ad a fuel stabilizer?
Should I start it every so often and how often?
Do I have to cover it?
Etc...

Essentially it'll be stored between October/November to April/May.
Having the wheels on rubber mats won't do anything. You lift the off the ground so they dont warp.
Though I will say I have never had an issue with this happening.

You could either disconnect the battery or put it on a trickle charger.

Cover it? If it is going to e outside then yes.

Starting it here and there is a good idea.
 

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Having the wheels on rubber mats won't do anything. You lift the off the ground so they dont warp.
Though I will say I have never had an issue with this happening.

You could either disconnect the battery or put it on a trickle charger.

Cover it? If it is going to e outside then yes.

Starting it here and there is a good idea.
Thanks, shorty. The bikes will be stored in the garage. I wasn't sure if there was an issue having the tires on concrete and them drying out on the contact patch or if that was a myth. For warping, I'll just move the bikes every once in a while.

If disconnecting the battery is all that needs to be done, I think I'll do that over hooking them up to a charger.

Fuel stabilizer necessary?
 

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I have some experience with winterizing. Put Sta-bil in the tank, fill the tank up and drive the bike around town. Remove the battery and occasionally put on trickle charger. Rotate the tires once in a while if sitting on cement to avoid drying out. If you're lucky enough to have a warm day (thanks global warming) then you just hook the battery back up and go. Get out there and enjoy. Winter is coming.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Excellent! I'd seen this Honda "Winter Storage Guide" once before. This list is great. Thanks.

Here is a quick summary:
  • Fill the gas tank with Ethanol-free fuel and a fuel stabilizer
  • Change the engine oil
  • Remove the spark plugs from each cylinder and unplug them from their caps
  • Remove the battery for proper storage
  • If the brake or clutch fluids haven't been changed in the last two years or 19,300 km (12,000 miles), do it now
  • If your vehicle is liquid cooled and the coolant hasn't been changed in the last two years or 38,600 km (24,000 miles), do it now
  • Clean the exterior of the bike
  • Make sure the drive chain is dry and then coat it with Pro Honda Chain Lube
  • Check that the tire air pressure is correct and place the vehicle in its storage location
  • Place a block under the engine so that the front wheel is off the ground. Stable motorcycle stands will also work as the vehicle does not have a center stand.
  • Make sure to check for the correct tire air pressure at least once a month during storage to prevent flat spots
  • Apply the breathable cover and you're set for the winter.
Many of these things appear to be to prevent excess moisture which causes rust and mildew.
 

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Excellent! I'd seen this Honda "Winter Storage Guide" once before. This list is great. Thanks.

Here is a quick summary:
  • Remove the spark plugs from each cylinder and unplug them from their caps
You're mistaken on this note, re-read it again.
From the list: "Remove the spark plugs from each cylinder and unplug them from their caps. Pour a tablespoon (15-20 cc) of clean engine oil in each cylinder. Cover the spark plug holes with a piece of cloth, turn the engine stop switch to the RUN position, then crank the engine through several revolutions to coat the cylinder walls with oil. Reinstall the spark plug."
 

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I just wanted to know if changing the oil before storage is really necisary? I was planning on cleaning it. Filling the tank and running fuel stabilizer and than changing oil before rising again next season..should I change it before storage and again after or? Also for my coolant what should I put in for the winter months during storage and what does it come with stock? (2017 Honda rebel) new rider here go easy on me!
 

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I just wanted to know if changing the oil before storage is really necisary? I was planning on cleaning it. Filling the tank and running fuel stabilizer and than changing oil before rising again next season..should I change it before storage and again after or? Also for my coolant what should I put in for the winter months during storage and what does it come with stock? (2017 Honda rebel) new rider here go easy on me!
I would advice to change it before storing. What I'm about to say is hardy the case now with such a brand new bike, but in general there will be particles in the oil (the old oil) And if you storage it during the winter with the old oil, these particles may "grow" a little stuck where they lay, and thus with the oil change when the season start again, you might not get all the "dirt" out of the engine. This is why people are adviced to change the oil on bikes before storing them. If you live in a climate where you can drive all year, then ofc it isn't necessary to change before it's due in regards of length or time, wich ever comes first.
As for the coolant; As long as you haven't by any change drained the system and filled it again with just tap water, then you don't need to worry about it. The coolant is meant to survive freezing temperature, and will last around 3 years before needing to be changed.
Also, you never add anything to the coolant for storage. The only thing you may want to add to it is topping it off with more coolant so that it's full. You'll see if that's needed on the container for the coolant fluid.

Cheers.
 

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I changed my oil and filter at the dealership at 800km, and then by myself about 170km (106 miles) ago. We had some unexpectedly warm weather and I ended up putting a few more miles on it after the change. Am I ok to let this oil sit in my bike until April, or should I be changing it again before putting it up on stands for hibernation?

Sorry for the idiot question, first time bike owner over here.
 

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I changed my oil and filter at the dealership at 800km, and then by myself about 170km (106 miles) ago. We had some unexpectedly warm weather and I ended up putting a few more miles on it after the change. Am I ok to let this oil sit in my bike until April, or should I be changing it again before putting it up on stands for hibernation?

Sorry for the idiot question, first time bike owner over here.
Fresh oil with only a few miles should be OK.

I think the main reason to do an oil change before storage is to ensure you have no water in the oil system/crankcase.

Frequent short trips where the engine and its oil don't heat up enough to get rid of the condensation/moisture can lead to a build up of water in the system (minute quantities, but it's still there). Left to sit for long periods, this can start corrosion.
 

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I usually just do the bare minimum and it seems to have worked fine over the years; change the oil, add some fuel stabilizer, borrow (steal) my brother's trickle charger and put the bike on a stand so the wheels are just hanging out.
 

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I don't understand.

Isn't your lounge room heated 24/7?
:wink2:





Sorry for the bad joke. Even in the Southern section of this continent, putting a bike away for winter is unheard of.
I'm sure that some of our members in colder climates can help though.

Cheers

Jim
LOLS Jim
I was thinking it. **** but we are lucky Down Under.
I couldn't imagine putting the bike away for the winter. Just throw on an extra layer under the jacket an maybe a neck warmer if its a real cold day.
 

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I usually just do the bare minimum and it seems to have worked fine over the years; change the oil, add some fuel stabilizer, borrow (steal) my brother's trickle charger and put the bike on a stand so the wheels are just hanging out.
What are you using as a stand to keep the wheels "hanging out"?

This is actually my only hurdle right now- finding a way I can keep my tires off of the concrete floor in the garage- that is not temp controlled- I dont have the funds to get the abba lift at the moment so hoping to see who is using what!

Thanks
 

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What are you using as a stand to keep the wheels "hanging out"?

This is actually my only hurdle right now- finding a way I can keep my tires off of the concrete floor in the garage
Ever had a regular good old bike, you know, that you power by pedaling? Just do as you would with such a bike, turn it upside down! Works like a charm, and with almost every bike out there!
 
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