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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After reading a post about a brand new Rebel 1100 having black smoke coming out from their exhaust and blamed it from low oil there was no comment on what grade of gas they were using. Some might think its a waste of money to use either 91-93 octane, however thats what I use in both the Rebel 500 & 1100. So far no issues. What octane of gas do you run in your Rebel?
 

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After reading a post about a brand new Rebel 1100 having black smoke coming out from their exhaust and blamed it from low oil there was no comment on what grade of gas they were using. Some might think its a waste of money to use either 91-93 octane, however thats what I use in both the Rebel 500 & 1100. So far no issues. What octane of gas do you run in your Rebel?
I use 87 in my 1100 dct. From what I understand higher octane is only necessary to stop pinging (pre detonation). You actually lose slightly power from using higher octane when unnecessary. There is no physical harm though.
 

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i also use 87

consider that whatever grade the last guy got from that pump is going to be a significant proportion of the couple gallons going into your tank - what's left in the hose and piping, etc

you're paying a premium price for a most likely diluted product
 

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I was thinking the same thing when I saw that thread, but I believe the guy who started it is from Australia, and I have no idea how their fuel octane ratings compare to ours in the US of A, so I refrained from commenting. But I also use 87, as the manual recommends. Zero benefits to running anything higher when the engine isn’t tuned for it.
 

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Mine is sitting in a family member's shed with whatever the dealership put in it right now but I can tell you that it will only ever have 87 in it moving forward.

Putting higher octane in than the manual says, unless you modify the engine, is wasting money. The manufacturer has the timing curve set up so that it will not ping on cheap gas. Premium actually burns at a slower rate than regular.. Adding premium to it can actually lead to incomplete combustion and carbon build up on valves if done all the time.

I read the black smoke post as well and am curious if the guy who told him he saw black smoke was mistaken. A big puff of blue smoke and a small puff of black look similar to an untrained eye. Given that the engine is new and was low on oil, it is more likely that it had oil get past the rings into the cylinder causing a bit of blue smoke that was misread as black.
 

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I run premium in my 500, have since new. I've also had the Shorty GP installed since the bike was only a few hundred kms old and have had 0 issues whatsoever in over 15k kms. However, I imagine I probably run my bike harder compared to most on here.

I know the manual says you only need 87 and everyone thinks anything more is just a waste of $$. To that I say do what you want, and let others do the same.

The difference to me, is the lack of ethanol in premium. It also greatly depends on where you get your fuel from.
 

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Now at about 6k miles. Regular gas in the Honda 1100, both Hawk 650's, Maverick Hybrid truck, Prius hybrid car. Never a problem. In CA right now there is 30 cents difference between regular and premium gas. Most of my riding on the 1100 is at lower rpms (3k-5k). The low rpm high torque motor is a great motor.

To me, gas threads are sort of like oil threads on a forum. You should always do as you wish. Buy premium gas if it makes you feel better, and your bike likes it or buy regular if you think there is no difference and are happy not spending as much money. Honda warranties the motor for 1 year with unlimited miles. That's plenty of time to figure out what kind of gas and oil you want to put in it. Ride and enjoy it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You only need high octane at very low altitudes but there's no place on earth that low. :unsure:
You only need high octane at very low altitudes but there's no place on earth that low. :unsure:

It was serendipity that I ended up talking to an engineer that works in a lab for Conoco Corporation. I asked about using higher octane gasoline in your auto and motorcycle. He had a strong option that it didn't matter what octane you used unless the manual called for a specific grade. He also mentioned that Top Tier Gas was worth seeking out. I looked up Top Tier Fuel and it is a standard that shows up at many of the gas stations most of us use.

I went to their website and counted 48 different brands that use this standard in the USA.

On the website it states: "TOP TIER™ Detergent Gasoline was first introduced in 2004 when a group of automakers recognized the need for a higher detergency gasoline standard than that required by regulation."

It turns out that Ten top automakers endorce TOP TIER™ Detergent Gasoline including Honda.

It might be worth taking a few minutes to look up if you're feeding your Rebel Top Tier Gasoline.
 

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HIGH octane has NOTHING to do with altitudes!
High octane is needed in high performance engines to prevent knocking.
The higher octane gases usually have more detergents and as listed above you can get pure gas in the 91 or 93 variety.
So if you go that route for 100% gas - yes you will get a small boost in mpgs. But that boost is not because of the high octane.

I agree buy what you wish, but please know the facts about octane, so you can educate your friends.
 

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agreed non e will get you a little more mpg, and is not normally detrimental to ice engines, running anything other than recommended octane may or may not damage certain engines, but if put in the wrong octane and get detonation (after run) hyou ain't helpin anything !!
 

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HIGH octane has NOTHING to do with altitudes!
High octane is needed in high performance engines to prevent knocking.
Sure it does. What do you think would happen if the air pressure goes up too high? Dynamic compression would rise enough to cause knock. The opposite occurs at high altitudes which is why lower octane fuel can be used. Low air pressure decreases dynamic compression and knock resistance naturally goes up. Simple physics.
 

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Sure it does. What do you think would happen if the air pressure goes up too high? Dynamic compression would rise enough to cause knock. The opposite occurs at high altitudes which is why lower octane fuel can be used. Low air pressure decreases dynamic compression and knock resistance naturally goes up. Simple physics.
Yup, same reason many drag racers use mini weather stations. (y)
 

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Its about the pressure created inside the bore when the piston compresses the gas mixture.
If your compression ratio is higher you need higher octane gas so that the gas does not ignite to soon and cause what is called knock.
What is happening outside the engine bore is irrelevant.
Simple gas physics!

In your logic there would be no need for a higher performance car, needing higher octane fuel, to need high octane in say Denver.
Go ahead and see if that's true. Its not.
 

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Jdock, you're not making any sense. How can you create the same pressure with less air? The compression ratio doesn't change with air density but dynamic cylinder pressure does and that's what causes knock if it's too high.
 
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