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The throttle has a narrow zone where if you just barely crack it open and hold it, the RPMs will be at about 1,500 which gives the bike barely enough throttle to move. It basically moves at walking speed. It feels the same as riding the clutch with a manual bike. You just have to get used to finding that sweet spot and from there you can use the rear brake for finer modulation.
 

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The throttle has a narrow zone where if you just barely crack it open and hold it, the RPMs will be at about 1,500 which gives the bike barely enough throttle to move. It basically moves at walking speed. It feels the same as riding the clutch with a manual bike. You just have to get used to finding that sweet spot and from there you can use the rear brake for finer modulation.
It's just like using a clutch but easier once you know where the throttle causes it to engage. I recently laid down my bike with a manual clutch because I got the steering at full lock going too slow. I couldn't feather the clutch while manipulating the throttle quick enough without risking a high side crash. Nor could I get my foot down in time to hold up the 850 lbs total weight (passenger aboard) but since I was already pretty much stopped with steering at full lock, it seemed like my best option. I crushed my foot a bit and only scratched the end of the clutch lever. The reason I lost momentum and ended up at full steering lock was because I was exiting the U-hand turn going uphill and didn't account for the extra weight slowing down the bike so quickly.
 

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For U-turns on my DCT, I put the bike in manual mode and 1st gear, so it doesn't shift up unexpectedly. In addition to the usual head and eyes and balance techniques, I use the rear brake against the tension of the throttle, and it works just fine, and actually is easier than feathering the throttle and keeping the clutch in the friction zone which you have to do with a manual tranny. Compared to making a u-turn on a big, heavy, Harley, which I also have, making a u-turn on a Rebel 1100 DCT is a piece of cake. Just put in the time to practice.

In addition to MCrider as specified above, also check out Ride Like a Pro on You Tube for slow speed maneuvering training, including u-turns.
 

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As a few people have said, you must hold some throttle and drag the rear brake. The bike will take care of feathering the clutch. I shift into rain mode for slow speed maneuvers as that makes the throttle less "twitchy". . Jerry Palladino explains what to do in this video. This was his first time on a DCT.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Thank you to everyone!

I am coming from a Harley Sportster and wanted a less heavy bike to tour on. My wife and I tour on the Sportster. My left hand developed a pulled muscle last tour and I could barely stand the pain to pull the clutch lever. I guess I am getting old. Anyway I am convinced to get a DCT.
 

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Thank you to everyone!

I am coming from a Harley Sportster and wanted a less heavy bike to tour on. My wife and I tour on the Sportster. My left hand developed a pulled muscle last tour and I could barely stand the pain to pull the clutch lever. I guess I am getting old. Anyway I am convinced to get a DCT.
Well, being as I was one of the people advocating for the bike, I do want to make one thing clear - I am not convinced this is the most comfortable bike for two people. I was focused on the maneuverability issue, but ergonomics is different. If all you are worried about is the left hand pain then the automatics transmission would help, but if overall comfort is a concern then as much as I like my 1100, it's not the most comfortable bike for long distance touring unless you replace the seat and I would even say suspension. My girlfriend will ride with me up to about an hour before it gets to be too uncomfortable for her with the stock rear seat and sissy bar. She's not a riding fanatic like I am, but if she were I would have gotten a different bike that was more comfortable for long distance touring. I just think you should take one for a spin if you can and definitely look into posts about touring with passengers with the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Well, being as I was one of the people advocating for the bike, I do want to make one thing clear - I am not convinced this is the most comfortable bike for two people. I was focused on the maneuverability issue, but ergonomics is different. If all you are worried about is the left hand pain then the automatics transmission would help, but if overall comfort is a concern then as much as I like my 1100, it's not the most comfortable bike for long distance touring unless you replace the seat and I would even say suspension. My girlfriend will ride with me up to about an hour before it gets to be too uncomfortable for her with the stock rear seat and sissy bar. She's not a riding fanatic like I am, but if she were I would have gotten a different bike that was more comfortable for long distance touring. I just think you should take one for a spin if you can and definitely look into posts about touring with passengers with the bike.
I have plans for Mustang seats and the suspension is still under consideration. I would prefer Öhlins on the rear and hopefully a fork upgrade kit (All I've seen so far are spring upgrades). Stock the travel is better than a Sportster and around the same for my modified Sportster.
 

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I have a 2021 DCT. I have practiced and practiced tight U-turns in a parking lot. I can now go into a parking spot, U-turn and come out in the next parking spot with about 2 feet to spare. I think it's about 16 feet, more than enough to turn around on a two lane road. I'm 74, 5'4" and chubby so I'm not athletic. It took me a while to accomplish this but I can do it about 90% of the time. I fell over once when i first began when the engine stalled. Here is what I've learned.

Review the videos on Youtube. At first I didn't think they were all that serious, but it really helps. It's easiest in Rain mode, 1st gear, about 3-5 mph. Practice light braking with light throttle (absolutely necessary...my engine died when I didn't do it because the rpms got too low). I try to keep my throttle steady and adjust speed with my brake. DO NOT use the front brake. Turn your head all the way and look where you want to go, (about 50-100 feet), NOT at your front tire . Your bike will go where you are looking. Move your butt to the opposite side to counter balance. As you get better, turn your handlebars fully. Also as you get better, speed helps because you can lean into the turn and therefore turn sharper.

I also don't like to turn right because I don't like the feeling of keeping my foot on the brake, but I can do it.

It takes practice, at least, it did for me. But then again I'm old, short and fat. The key for the DCT is keeping light throttle and light braking at the same time.

 

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Lot of good advice and videos on U-turns above. I'll add one more.
I found the advice on this video of countersteering right before the turn incredibly useful and changed my U-turn ability. Try it, I was amazed at the difference with a slight tap of counter steering.

 

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Take it to the shop. That should not happen.
Yea, I asked them about it and the guy said that resetting it lets it relearn the driving style. Seems NYC driving style messes with it's mind hahah. I reset it after my first six months where I was learning the bike and it's been perfect ever since. A bit like that first maintenance required early on.

If it started again I would probably bring it in though.
 
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