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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
How do you make a U-turn with a DCT? I am referring to those first gear U-turns with a manual clutched bike where the clutch is slipping and the engine RPMs are raised to maintain balance. How does that work on a DCT? Here is a video of the U-turn I am referring too.


I have almost convinced myself to buy the DCT.

Edit, added video.
 

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My 21 dct doesn't slip, from a start or from when it shifts into first slowing down, I regularly )daily) make a u turn and can keep it in one lane with no engine/ clutch problem. when sitting at neutral and shifting into first it doesn't move, but touch the throttle even a tiny bit and it starts forward without an increase in rpm come visit I'll let you test ride, buy it and ride home :) you might need wet gear and a sammich to make the trip
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My 21 dct doesn't slip, from a start or from when it shifts into first slowing down, I regularly )daily) make a u turn and can keep it in one lane with no engine/ clutch problem. when sitting at neutral and shifting into first it doesn't move, but touch the throttle even a tiny bit and it starts forward without an increase in rpm come visit I'll let you test ride, buy it and ride home :) you might need wet gear and a sammich to make the trip
Thank you for the reply.

Not sure you fully understood what I meant so I updated my description.

I am referring to those first gear U-turns with a manual clutched bike where the clutch is slipping and the engine RPMs are raised to maintain balance.

I would likely need a boat too since I am in Europe. :)
 

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Check straight lines are not a problem. I would not want to live in New York, I feel your pain though.
I guess what I meant is that I can crawl along at minimal speeds and maintain balance. I do a bit of weaving back and forth in the lane so I don't need to put my foot down and to keep myself entertained. It's not far from that being able to keep turning into a Uturn - in fact sometimes I'm so fed up I would consider it...

It's not so bad in NYC with a bike. I also have a Piaggio 150 I use for short trips, which helps. Three downers for me is garage cost, snow and idiots knocking my bike over when it's parked because they can't drive right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I guess what I meant is that I can crawl along at minimal speeds and maintain balance. I do a bit of weaving back and forth in the lane so I don't need to put my foot down and to keep myself entertained. It's not far from that being able to keep turning into a Uturn - in fact sometimes I'm so fed up I would consider it...

It's not so bad in NYC with a bike. I also have a Piaggio 150 I use for short trips, which helps. Three downers for me is garage cost, snow and idiots knocking my bike over when it's parked because they can't drive right.
Here is a video of the U-turn I am referring too.

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Some poor guy over in the Africa Twin DCT forums accidentally over twisted the throttle which was an instant crash. This is recoverable in a U-turn maneuver with a manual clutch since the clutch is usually not fully engaged.

Many motorcycle riders never practice this maneuver. I still struggle with it when the bike is loaded with a passenger and luggage for an 8 day tour. I am asking here to see if this is a negative with the DCT or how to handle this maneuver. I would prefer a DCT with a manual override clutch and a foot shifter, call it the best of both worlds.
 

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Some poor guy over in the Africa Twin DCT forums accidentally over twisted the throttle which was an instant crash. This is recoverable in a U-turn maneuver with a manual clutch since the clutch is usually not fully engaged.
Yea I get it but I guess all I can say is you can't accidentally crank the throttle in the middle of the turn. Not trying to be a smart-ass, but I guess that's a legitimate danger. The 1100 takes off when you crank the throttle, which is great when you are heading straight. However I have done U-turns and you just get use to going slow on the throttle for slow maneuvers. Some day we will all be riding electric bikes and we will need to adjust to no clutch, although maybe they will add one in for the hell of it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yea I get it but I guess all I can say is you can't accidentally crank the throttle in the middle of the turn. Not trying to be a smart-ass, but I guess that's a legitimate danger. The 1100 takes off when you crank the throttle, which is great when you are heading straight. However I have done U-turns and you just get use to going slow on the throttle for slow maneuvers. Some day we will all be riding electric bikes and we will need to adjust to no clutch, although maybe they will add one in for the hell of it?
Yeah, I just cannot wrap my mind around how to perform this maneuver if I cannot slip the clutch, even more so when load with passenger and luggage. Bonus the bike is lighter so backing up when loaded should be a little easier.
 

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Yeah, I just cannot wrap my mind around how to perform this maneuver if I cannot slip the clutch, even more so when load with passenger and luggage. Bonus the bike is lighter so backing up when loaded should be a little easier.
Use the rear break to hold speed back from throttle?
 

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That should work in theory, has anyone actually done this?

In the Alps on narrow roads the hairpin curves can be like a U-turn.
Yes, I was about to suggest this, but @BoxingDoctor beat me to it. There is a point between fully disengaged and fully engaged that the clutch does slip from a dead stop. It would help to practice some crawling starts in a parking lot, or even on a slight incline, to get a feel for that throttle-clutch relationship. Once you’re comfortable with that (should only take a few starts), then practice dragging the rear brake, first in a straight line, feathering light pressure on the pedal between rolling and stopping, so you get a feel for how much brake you need to apply. That’s actually a well known low-speed technique for bikes with manual clutches as well, but it’s even more useful with a DCT, because there’s one less piece in the drive train that you have full control over (the clutch). This is very useful for any time you’re moving at a constant slow speed - busy parking lots, heavy traffic, very tight turns.

Above all else, though, it is critical to not put any sudden or abrupt input on the throttle - you have to remain light and smooth throughout your turn.

Here’s a video explaining it, but a search for u-turn trail braking should turn up a few more.

 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes, I was about to suggest this, but @BoxingDoctor beat me to it. There is a point between fully disengaged and fully engaged that the clutch does slip from a dead stop. It would help to practice some crawling starts in a parking lot, or even on a slight incline, to get a feel for that throttle-clutch relationship. Once you’re comfortable with that (should only take a few starts), then practice dragging the rear brake, first in a straight line, feathering light pressure on the pedal between rolling and stopping, so you get a feel for how much brake you need to apply. That’s actually a well known low-speed technique for bikes with manual clutches as well, but it’s even more useful with a DCT, because there’s one less piece in the drive train that you have full control over (the clutch). This is very useful for any time you’re moving at a constant slow speed - busy parking lots, heavy traffic, very tight turns.

Above all else, though, it is critical to not put any sudden or abrupt input on the throttle - you have to remain light and smooth throughout your turn.

Here’s a video explaining it, but a search for u-turn trail braking should turn up a few more.

Thank you for the reply!

I was thinking along the same lines that I would need to practice straight first to get a feel for the clutch engagement. Is the clutch a manual centrifugal or based on electronic, just curious? I will try to look it up in the manual.
 

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Thank you for the reply!

I was thinking along the same lines that I would need to practice straight first to get a feel for the clutch engagement. Is the clutch a manual centrifugal or based on electronic, just curious? I will try to look it up in the manual.
It’s a dual clutch. I’m not sure what it is physically, but it is all electronically actuated. It feels like there’s somebody else working the clutch lever for you. It just takes a few times starting from a stop to get a feel for how it engages, but it’s really pretty natural feeling. I had no problem adapting, and I’d been riding manuals for a few hundred years. Twist the throttle easy, it takes off easy; twist it hard, better hang on because it launches hard.
 

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How do you make a U-turn with a DCT? I am referring to those first gear U-turns with a manual clutched bike where the clutch is slipping and the engine RPMs are raised to maintain balance. How does that work on a DCT? Here is a video of the U-turn I am referring too.


I have almost convinced myself to buy the DCT.

Edit, added video.
I bought my first motorcycle one month ago, a Rebel 1100 DCT. I had never ridden before. last weekend I passed the Ohio Skills test which has a 24’ u-turn, which is typical of what yoI might encounter in real life. I would say that you have to master throttle control with some slight rear brake pressure since you don’t have a clutch. You will need to practice, practice, practice your slow speed maneuvers and then you will be able to do it. Make practice part of your weekly routine.
 

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How do you make a U-turn with a DCT? I am referring to those first gear U-turns with a manual clutched bike where the clutch is slipping and the engine RPMs are raised to maintain balance. How does that work on a DCT? Here is a video of the U-turn I am referring too.


I have almost convinced myself to buy the DCT.

Edit, added video.
Hi,
First of all - Rebel 1100 DCT is my first bike, I have only ridden manual bike during my motorcycle's license course & exam last year. I started to ride my bike early April this year, now I have 4K km under my belt. This is all experience I have. At the beginning I practiced quite a lot at the empty parking lot making 8s at the low speed. My thoughts:
1. When you release the throttle the bike will eventually going to stop. You have to very precisely and gently pull the throttle (like 2 mm) and keep it in this position (still hard for me to do) to maintain crawling speed ~8-10 km/h.
2. I have tried the dragging the rear brake technique but I found it not useful for me. Because I was too scared to occupy my leg with the brake during a slow turn. ;-)
3. On this DCT bike you have all controls in your right hand. For couple of times during slow maneuvers I had troubles to prevent the bike from dropping. Especially when I was slowly making a turn and needed to suddenly stop - for couple of times I was still keeping the throttle open (a little) simultaneously pulling the brake. Then the bike is starting to hop and is hard to maintain. It is a bit scary situation, too ;-) If it was a manual bike than I would simply pull brake & clutch at the same time and throttle is disconnected - no problems... (I haven't drop it ;-).
Overall I am happy with my bike but you need practice for slow maneuvers.
I hope it helps.
Best
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Hi,
First of all - Rebel 1100 DCT is my first bike, I have only ridden manual bike during my motorcycle's license course & exam last year. I started to ride my bike early April this year, now I have 4K km under my belt. This is all experience I have. At the beginning I practiced quite a lot at the empty parking lot making 8s at the low speed. My thoughts:
1. When you release the throttle the bike will eventually going to stop. You have to very precisely and gently pull the throttle (like 2 mm) and keep it in this position (still hard for me do do) to maintain crawling speed ~8-10 km/h.
2. A have tried the dragging the rear brake technique but I found it not useful for me. Because I was too scared to occupy my leg with the brake during a slow turn. ;-)
3. On this DCT bike you have all controls in your right hand. For couple of times during slow maneuvers I had troubles to prevent the bike from dropping. Especially when I was slowly making a turn and needed to suddenly stop - for couple of times I was still keeping the throttle open (a little) simultaneously pulling the brake. Then the bike is starting to hop and is hard to maintain. It is a bit scary situation, too ;-) If it was a manual bike than I would simply pull brake & clutch at the same time and throttle is disconnected - no problems... (I haven't drop it ;-).
Overall I am happy with my bike but you need practice for slow maneuvers.
I hope it helps.
Best
Slow speed turns are hard to master. One rule I always broke even in front of motorcycle educators was to never use the front brake during a slow speed turn or a stop. If you jam on the front brake during a slow turn you will likely go down. I have been training myself to only use the rear brake at slow speeds. It works great in a slow turn and also when coming to a stop. I should note none of the instructors I have trained with have corrected me.

I highly recommend watching these training videos.

 
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