Honda Rebel 300 & 500 Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

I've been contemplating to try and venture onto highways with my 300 this riding season (after this godawful weather goes away). I wasn't sure how the bike would handle there. Any advice? Can the 300 handle highway speeds? So for my context, that would be around 115 to 120 km/h for a 125 pound rider. Is that ok for this bike. Canadian riders' experience on the highway is especially appreciated here.

Thanks all, and safe riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,328 Posts
Hammad,

You will be fine on the highway with the 300 up to about 100+ KM/H.

If there is a head wind it may be a bit of a struggle.

I weigh about 170 LB and the 300 would have been enough for me until I ran into the Texas headwinds.

Good luck,

Kenny G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Hammad,

You will be fine on the highway with the 300 up to about 100+ KM/H.

If there is a head wind it may be a bit of a struggle.

I weigh about 170 LB and the 300 would have been enough for me until I ran into the Texas headwinds.

Good luck,

Kenny G
Thanks Kenny. It's just that drivers in this area are less than trustworthy, and that's an understatement. So I was worried about maybe going too slowly. But thank you for letting me know the bike can handle it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
247 Posts
Thanks Kenny. It's just that drivers in this area are less than trustworthy, and that's an understatement. So I was worried about maybe going too slowly. But thank you for letting me know the bike can handle it.
You will be able to get to highway speeds, but you really won't have any juice left to really pass. That's the one reason I picked up a 500, I want to commute to work which is 65-70mph for about 30-40 minutes and I'll need the ability to pass and get into position in the changeovers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
You will be able to get to highway speeds, but you really won't have any juice left to really pass. That's the one reason I picked up a 500, I want to commute to work which is 65-70mph for about 30-40 minutes and I'll need the ability to pass and get into position in the changeovers.
Yes I figure an upgrade is in order for me. I had initially went back and forth between the 300 and 500 as my first bike. Although I received a lot of advice from people who suggested the 500 as they claimed that I'd get bored of my 300 quickly, which I did. Still, I think it was bad advice to suggest a larger displacement bike to a beginner. in retrospect, even though it only took me one season to crave an update, I would still start with the 300 and advise any beginner to do the same.

Having said that, do you think the weight difference is significant between the 300 and the 500? I love being able to maneuver my bike around without much effort as a slender man. Would you say a 125 pound, 5 foot 9 male can handle the 500 as a second bike?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
I am a 5 foot female and I can handle the 500 just fine. You will be fine unless you are really old or suffer from some muscle wasting disease.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,328 Posts
Yes I figure an upgrade is in order for me. I had initially went back and forth between the 300 and 500 as my first bike. Although I received a lot of advice from people who suggested the 500 as they claimed that I'd get bored of my 300 quickly, which I did. Still, I think it was bad advice to suggest a larger displacement bike to a beginner. in retrospect, even though it only took me one season to crave an update, I would still start with the 300 and advise any beginner to do the same.

Having said that, do you think the weight difference is significant between the 300 and the 500? I love being able to maneuver my bike around without much effort as a slender man. Would you say a 125 pound, 5 foot 9 male can handle the 500 as a second bike?
Hammad,

You won't have any trouble if you switch to a Rebel 500, especially with it being a second bike after a season on the 300......

Kenny G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thank you all so kindly for the advice.

I am a 5 foot female and I can handle the 500 just fine. You will be fine unless you are really old or suffer from some muscle wasting disease.

No, haha. I'm neither of those. I figured I would be fine as well. Just didn't want to rush into it. Either way, insurance will probably go up too, and I have developed some real feelings for this little 300 so it might be hard to give her up so soon. I'll check how she handles on the highway and if it's sufficient, I think I'll be fine. However, it's nice to know that in case I do go for an upgrade that it won't be too overbearing.

Safe riding folks.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
247 Posts
Still, I think it was bad advice to suggest a larger displacement bike to a beginner.
And I would have to disagree, I am a beginner and I have a 500, in fact my MSF class was taught using the Harley Davidson Street 500, which is also a 500cc bike with a curb weight of 514 lbs (100 lbs MORE than the Rebel 500 ABS). The Rebel 500 ABS weighs 414 lbs curb weight and really isn't that much more than the 300.

The 500 is a great beginner bike as its not geared for racing and starts are nice and easy and smooth. Really the only different between the 300 and 500 is that the 500 has a bit more to give at highway speeds and the 300 doesn't. The max difference between a 300 without ABS and a 500 with ABS is 50 lbs.

Per Honda spec page:
2018 Honda Rebel 300 curb weight - 364 lbs
2018 Honda Rebel 300 ABS curb weight - 370 lbs
2018 Honda Rebel 500 curb weight - 408 lbs
2018 Honda Rebel 500 ABS curb weight - 414 lbs

So with this information, why would you say that the 500 is not a beginners bike? And lets not talk about price because even at $6400 a new 500 ABS is still totally in the average beginners price range (for newer bikes)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
And I would have to disagree, I am a beginner and I have a 500, in fact my MSF class was taught using the Harley Davidson Street 500, which is also a 500cc bike with a curb weight of 514 lbs (100 lbs MORE than the Rebel 500 ABS). The Rebel 500 ABS weighs 414 lbs curb weight and really isn't that much more than the 300.

The 500 is a great beginner bike as its not geared for racing and starts are nice and easy and smooth. Really the only different between the 300 and 500 is that the 500 has a bit more to give at highway speeds and the 300 doesn't. The max difference between a 300 without ABS and a 500 with ABS is 50 lbs.

Per Honda spec page:
2018 Honda Rebel 300 curb weight - 364 lbs
2018 Honda Rebel 300 ABS curb weight - 370 lbs
2018 Honda Rebel 500 curb weight - 408 lbs
2018 Honda Rebel 500 ABS curb weight - 414 lbs

So with this information, why would you say that the 500 is not a beginners bike? And lets not talk about price because even at $6400 a new 500 ABS is still totally in the average beginners price range (for newer bikes)
I was talking about starting on a higher displacement in general. Even so, personally, I think the smaller the bike for a newbie the better. But that's my experience. You can disagree but I find advice from people that discourage people from smaller displacement motorcycles to be counterintuitive at best, and dangerous at worst. Every rider is different and you want to err on the side of caution.

Secondly, I'm not sure where you're placed, but Canadian insurance, esp ON, on motorcycles is quite steep. A higher displacement motorcycle raises that price even more, so there is definitely a financial element there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
And I would have to disagree, I am a beginner and I have a 500, in fact my MSF class was taught using the Harley Davidson Street 500, which is also a 500cc bike with a curb weight of 514 lbs (100 lbs MORE than the Rebel 500 ABS). The Rebel 500 ABS weighs 414 lbs curb weight and really isn't that much more than the 300.

The 500 is a great beginner bike as its not geared for racing and starts are nice and easy and smooth. Really the only different between the 300 and 500 is that the 500 has a bit more to give at highway speeds and the 300 doesn't. The max difference between a 300 without ABS and a 500 with ABS is 50 lbs.

Per Honda spec page:
2018 Honda Rebel 300 curb weight - 364 lbs
2018 Honda Rebel 300 ABS curb weight - 370 lbs
2018 Honda Rebel 500 curb weight - 408 lbs
2018 Honda Rebel 500 ABS curb weight - 414 lbs

So with this information, why would you say that the 500 is not a beginners bike? And lets not talk about price because even at $6400 a new 500 ABS is still totally in the average beginners price range (for newer bikes)

Don't forget the 300 has 25 less horse power. I graduated my MSF and my dad wanted me to get the 300. So glad I opted for a 500. The extra weight and power is a plus.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
247 Posts
Don't forget the 300 has 25 less horse power. I graduated my MSF and my dad wanted me to get the 300. So glad I opted for a 500. The extra weight and power is a plus.
I almost went for the 300, but after watching some reviews from riders my size I knew it wouldnt allow me to comfortably commute to work in the nicer weather as traffic on my way to work generally cruises between 75-85mph and while the 300 can hit those speeds it has nothing left to give with a 285lbs rider.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
247 Posts
I was talking about starting on a higher displacement in general. Even so, personally, I think the smaller the bike for a newbie the better. But that's my experience. You can disagree but I find advice from people that discourage people from smaller displacement motorcycles to be counterintuitive at best, and dangerous at worst. Every rider is different and you want to err on the side of caution.

Secondly, I'm not sure where you're placed, but Canadian insurance, esp ON, on motorcycles is quite steep. A higher displacement motorcycle raises that price even more, so there is definitely a financial element there.
I never meant to imply that a 500cc 'anything' was fine for a new rider, my comment was only based on the Rebel 500 and nothing more. A 300 might be just fine for many people, but larger men like myself on a 300 means safe highway travel is pretty much off the table. But overall I feel the 500 is a perfect starter bike as its able to easily have smooth and consistent starts and has the power when you need it most.

As for insurance in the US (for my state anyway) insurance prices between a 300 and 500 are very little difference, now once you start getting over 600-700 then prices start to change dramatically and from what I've been told by my friends that ride sport bikes is that if the bike has the an 'R' in its model name have a tendency to have higher insurance costs simply for a letter.

But by all means everyone should do their own research to find a bike that fits their individual needs including cost of the bike and cost of insurance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
527 Posts
I almost went for the 300, but after watching some reviews from riders my size I knew it wouldnt allow me to comfortably commute to work in the nicer weather as traffic on my way to work generally cruises between 75-85mph and while the 300 can hit those speeds it has nothing left to give with a 285lbs rider.
Agreed, at that weight I wouldn't consider the 300.
I'm at 185-190lbs now and the 300 has the perfect amount of power for city and pulling on highway.
But honestly once you start going that far north of 200lbs the 300 will definitely feel a bit lethargic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Yes, you would be comfortable with the Rebel 500. I'm slimly built and do fine. The issue is not really the bike weight since the weight difference between the 300 and 500 is not huge and it's very well balanced. It's the extra power that can amplify mistakes, like poor throttle control, that a beginner might have. If you have a handle on that, I would go for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Happy to report that I have since been on the highway in small doses. It's a thrilling experience and the 300 can definitely handle it. A little susceptible to strong winds, but clutching on to the tank with my thighs and loosening the grips makes it much better. Mirrors shake a bit too much. The 300 can definitely handle highway speeds with the proper technique.

Thank you all for all the advice and encouragement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
I ride my Honda Rebel 300 almost exclusively on I-95 and I have never had a problem other than wind getting on my nerves. It's a good strongly built reliable bike that has no problem getting up to highway speeds and handles just fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I ride my Rebel 500 95% highway from Northern Alberta to Kamloops BC, Canada.

Mountains, rain, Elk, Deer, Moose, Bears, this bike handles them all.

Throttle has a bit left over for the steep inclines and if you need to pass someone. Don't ride like an *ss and respect the pavement, you will be fine.

The only caution I would add is fuel, don't hesitate, top her up. Construction, weather and wind all add to your consumption and nights up here are not forgiving in the mountains where it will drop within a few degrees of freezing even mid summer.


Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top