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I just need to vent. The Rebel has some nice touches, like a hinged gas cap, a plastic type guard off the right clutch cable side so you dont scratch the engine, etc.

But why, for the love of easy maintence, is the muffler designed this way. Not only is it in the way for any type of paddock stand, it is also in the way of the axle nut, so any chain slack adjustments require taking it off. Come on design guys, you ride and take care of bikes right? Geez.
 

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Is it hard to remove for some reason? Usually mufflers aren't but I'm not familiar with the Rebel as I don't have one yet. As an aircraft mechanic I tend to only view things as entire tasks, which sometimes involves removing seemingly unrelated items for access. How much time does it add?
 

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Is it hard to remove for some reason? Usually mufflers aren't but I'm not familiar with the Rebel as I don't have one yet. As an aircraft mechanic I tend to only view things as entire tasks, which sometimes involves removing seemingly unrelated items for access. How much time does it add?
2-5 minutes extra.
 

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i agree about the paddock stand, i had to put extra rubber there to not scratch it.
But you don't need to remove the muffler to adjust the chain slack
 

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I just need to vent. The Rebel has some nice touches, like a hinged gas cap, a plastic type guard off the right clutch cable side so you dont scratch the engine, etc.

But why, for the love of easy maintence, is the muffler designed this way. Not only is it in the way for any type of paddock stand, it is also in the way of the axle nut, so any chain slack adjustments require taking it off. Come on design guys, you ride and take care of bikes right? Geez.
I said the same thing but everyone here said how easy it is to remove the muffler. We'll see.
 

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24mm flat O/E spanner
14mm hex wrench
5mm hex wrench
17mm ring O/E spanner
15cm engineer's rule
What are you using to torque the axle nut and what torque measurement is required? My FZ requires 137 ft lb with a 32mm socket which needs about 3-4" of space even before considering putting it on our taking it off. Maybe your tool is different than I'm thinking of but nothing in your list is anything that I could use with a torque wrench.

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What are you using to torque the axle nut and what torque measurement is required? ..................
Just a standard long 24mm open ender. The torque figure is 88N-m (65lb-ft) and I can guesstimate that after working on aircraft and ships for over 50 years, and on my bikes even longer.

In all of the hundreds of chain adjustments I've done in my lifetime I've rarely used a torque wrench and never had any problem with things coming off.
The exceptions were when I was doing bike maintenance in the hangar on night shifts and had access to calibrated torque spanners (and heaps of other great tools).

And if any of you think the axle nut on a Rebel is cramped, try getting at some of the accessories on aircraft engines or hydraulic/pneumatic components. You need double jointed arms and fingers for some bits.
 

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I do agree with the muffler being a bit of a nuisance in its current location, yes it is very easy to slacken off an move it out of the way for maintanence/paddock stand placement, but it’s an unnecessary idea, design which future updated rebels should have the muffler angled up slightly or a flat spot on the inside.

I’ve seen many rebels where they’ve squeezed the stand supports between the muffler & used felt or rubber tubing to protect from scratches. These two pics were at the Honda dealer.
 

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Just a standard long 24mm open ender. The torque figure is 88N-m (65lb-ft) and I can guesstimate that after working on aircraft and ships for over 50 years, and on my bikes even longer.

In all of the hundreds of chain adjustments I've done in my lifetime I've rarely used a torque wrench and never had any problem with things coming off.
The exceptions were when I was doing bike maintenance in the hangar on night shifts and had access to calibrated torque spanners (and heaps of other great tools).

And if any of you think the axle nut on a Rebel is cramped, try getting at some of the accessories on aircraft engines or hydraulic/pneumatic components. You need double jointed arms and fingers for some bits.
You definitely don't have to explain aircraft maintenance to me, that's why I use a torque wrench every time and why I have no issue with removing something quick that makes the task easier. I understand that many won't use a torque wrench but considering how few critical areas separate me from the asphalt, I'll probably take the extra two minutes and do it right, lol.


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I hear you loud and clear. If my work on aircraft called for specific TV on a fastener I always used calibrated torque wrenches.

Everything from the tiny 1/4" drive models to the big prop wrenches that took two guys to haul on.

I like your pic, reminds me of frozen droop stops and fire hoses :)
 

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We were in your neck of the woods just a couple of months back. Actually, the aircraft that had gone over just got taken off the boat from the return trip back a week or two ago. Sounds like once mine is through paint and airworthy that my crew will be slated to head over there this winter (your summer) once our fire season ends and yours kicks up again.
 

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We were in your neck of the woods just a couple of months back. Actually, the aircraft that had gone over just got taken off the boat from the return trip back a week or two ago. Sounds like once mine is through paint and airworthy that my crew will be slated to head over there this winter (your summer) once our fire season ends and yours kicks up again.
Appreciate your assistance. Where will you be based?
 

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Appreciate your assistance. Where will you be based?
Sounds like somewhere around Camden, New South Wales? I'm not 100% sure, tbh, I hired onto this company right around the time that they were shipping the airframe back. The nature of fire season tends to involve a lot of moving as well, so I guess I'll see whenever that time comes.
 

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Just a standard long 24mm open ender. The torque figure is 88N-m (65lb-ft) and I can guesstimate that after working on aircraft and ships for over 50 years, and on my bikes even longer.

In all of the hundreds of chain adjustments I've done in my lifetime I've rarely used a torque wrench and never had any problem with things coming off.
The exceptions were when I was doing bike maintenance in the hangar on night shifts and had access to calibrated torque spanners (and heaps of other great tools).

And if any of you think the axle nut on a Rebel is cramped, try getting at some of the accessories on aircraft engines or hydraulic/pneumatic components. You need double jointed arms and fingers for some bits.
I worked and flew on these birds:

P-3 Orion


and the S-3 Viking

 

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Spent many hours in the bowels of Australian P3-Bs/P3-Cs servicing weapons systems, and before that P2V Neptunes, talk about ancient technology. And then there was the interesting Grumman S2G Tracker. All the stuff from P2/P3s jammed in a carrier borne ASW bird, now they were a test of dexterity to service.

One day I'll have to come up with a list of aircraft I worked on, It'll probably be longer than my bike list :surprise:
 

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For those that would like to use a torque wrench on their rear axle without having to remove the muffler pick up a Crowfoot Wrench to attach to your torque wrench. It's cheap and has plenty of room.

Sunex 97324 1/2-Inch Drive 24-mm Jumbo Crowfoot Wrench
by Sunex Tools
Link: http://a.co/2butYmM
$10.
 

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