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Discussion Starter #1
So, some background.

I'm a newb rider, I have about 600 miles on a scooter but only about 300 on my rebel, although I have been driving for 30+ years.
Recently I received an advertising email from a bike kit retailer talking about the benefits of puncture repair kits and encouraging people to buy one (of course).
The ones they are selling are needle type things that you push into the hole which seal the puncture so that you can re-inflate the tyre and get back to riding. I guess they are temporary fixes to get you moving to a dealer / tyre seller rather than a permanent fix.

From a car perspective I can't remember the last time that I had a puncture but I know a lot of people that have had them over the years. With a car it always comes with a jack / spare tyre / type inflater etc. as they have the space for them but when it comes to bikes I have no idea.

My thoughts are that if you have a puncture you should be thinking more about staying upright when it happens that about moving afterwards - but assuming you notice quick enough and stop ok - what then ? Are the repair kits actually worth considering ?

They don't seem to be something that needs to be in the tool bag but don't know enough to be sure.
 

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Considering that they are quite cheap, why not?.. You never know. I bought one, never carry with me but I will on my longer tours just in case
 

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they are cheap but here's something to consider. if you do get a puncture, and you have the repair kit with you ( i'm assuming here you have a slow leak that you notice and not some sort of blow out, emergency situation), it works by reaming out the hole with the provided rasp/file. then inserting the plug (possibly with included glue/sealer). the problem is during this process you're losing more air. so even if you get the hole plugged, you now need to blow up the tire, so unless you're also carrying a tire inflator, you're really not going to be able to go anywhere.
Patching is a much better scenario just like a car, but of course you need to do that at a shop or similar location that has the required machines ; ie-a rim clamp, and tire balancer, since it requires removing tire from rim. this is a much more permanent repair, but again you'd need a tow or whatever to move the bike

i think in my own experience if i had a puncture, regardless if i could make it to where i was going or not, i would spend the money and replace the tire rather than risk the repair not holding 100%. i mean my life is much more at risk on 2 wheels, and if 1 of them has a leak.. those aren't good odds to me, so i'd just start over rather than repairing the old one.

just my 2 cents.
 

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they are cheap but here's something to consider. if you do get a puncture, and you have the repair kit with you ( i'm assuming here you have a slow leak that you notice and not some sort of blow out, emergency situation), it works by reaming out the hole with the provided rasp/file. then inserting the plug (possibly with included glue/sealer). the problem is during this process you're losing more air. so even if you get the hole plugged, you now need to blow up the tire, so unless you're also carrying a tire inflator, you're really not going to be able to go anywhere.
Patching is a much better scenario just like a car, but of course you need to do that at a shop or similar location that has the required machines ; ie-a rim clamp, and tire balancer, since it requires removing tire from rim. this is a much more permanent repair, but again you'd need a tow or whatever to move the bike

i think in my own experience if i had a puncture, regardless if i could make it to where i was going or not, i would spend the money and replace the tire rather than risk the repair not holding 100%. i mean my life is much more at risk on 2 wheels, and if 1 of them has a leak.. those aren't good odds to me, so i'd just start over rather than repairing the old one.

just my 2 cents.
I think you're missing the point of why these kits exist. The kits are designed to be able to get you safely back to civilization or the next repair facility-not to help you avoid patching or replacement. Many people go out for long, scenic rides in areas with little or no cell coverage, and a tire repair kit can be the difference between a brutal solitary walk followed by a ridiculously expensive tow or simple a minor inconvenience and some lost time.

You have to deflate the tire to even safely put in the rasp, so you're definitely going to need a compressor. Ideally one that has clips to attach to the battery, preferably also with the adapter to plug into your trickle charger adapter or cigarette lighter. I don't personally have a repair kit yet but I absolutely will as soon as I order some bags to carry it in.
 

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I think you're missing the point of why these kits exist. The kits are designed to be able to get you safely back to civilization or the next repair facility-not to help you avoid patching or replacement. Many people go out for long, scenic rides in areas with little or no cell coverage, and a tire repair kit can be the difference between a brutal solitary walk followed by a ridiculously expensive tow or simple a minor inconvenience and some lost time.

You have to deflate the tire to even safely put in the rasp, so you're definitely going to need a compressor. Ideally one that has clips to attach to the battery, preferably also with the adapter to plug into your trickle charger adapter or cigarette lighter. I don't personally have a repair kit yet but I absolutely will as soon as I order some bags to carry it in.
Something like this should do the trick.

https://www.jpcycles.com/product/833-184/bikemaster-mini-air-compressor
 

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how am i missing the point? i replied with many scenarios and opinions. even mention you'd still need an inflator if you use the puncture kit, which is good information since you'd still need air in the tire.
trying to give plenty of info to the OP so they are well informed.

if you're not being constructive, i see no reason to reply to/quote me
 

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I have with me a kit that is meant for cars.
It has everything I need in case of a flat, and comes with Co2 canisters that I can "pump" up the wheel with again, thus not needing any compressor or such bulky items.
 
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