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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Everyone,

I am new to riding and had a question on the DCT version of the Rebel 1100. With a reasonable amount of practice can a new rider pass the driving test with the 1100 DCT? To give a bit of back story I took the MSF course and enjoyed it however I also learned that because of having no feeling in my middle and ring finger on my left hand and arthritis in the others I could not feather the clutch, it was an all or nothing pull which of course resulted in a lot of stalls. It was frustrating to not be able to ride the bike as it was intended.

If I buy the 1100 DCT do you think I will I be able to learn to do the parking lot tests on it or will it just be to much power for a new rider to effectively learn on?

Thank you for any advice you can give.

Ash
 

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2021 Rebel 1100, 2004 Shadow Aero, 2015 KLR, 2014 CB500X
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Hello, Ash12... glad to see that you want to get into riding. I own a Rebel 1100 DCT. This is just my opinion - IT'S NOT THE BEST, but it's not the worst choice for a new rider. It has a low seat height, is relatively light, and couldn't be easier to ride. This bike has power, and I have never recommended a 1000cc ride for anyone just starting out. This does have different modes - power levels that make it less intimidating, but it's still a really powerful bike. Grabbing a handful of throttle really brings it to life and it flat moves.

Again, my opinion, but if you have a place that has little or no traffic at all to practice low speed turns, braking, shifting, getting to know controls, etc...then get the bike. I purchased a Ninja 250 for my wife to start on, and in less than 2 weeks we were upgrading her to a SV650. This bike has an advantage for learning on with the DCT, and it could save a new rider a lot of money in upgrading motorcycles. All in all, considering that you have issues with the clutch hand, and taking into account that your right hand is just fine, it's a great bike. Be careful, and take your time getting used to any new bike.

I would take another course, and see if any of your friends or people you work with ride. When it comes to safety, you've got all the time in the world to get familiar with riding before throwing yourself into heavy traffic. Best of luck, and I hope that you get as much fulfillment out of riding as I have.
 

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There’s a lot to learn at first and, in my opinion, a low powered and light bike is the ideal choice for a beginner. It’s imperative that one develops confidence before graduating to a powerful bike. Be patient and start out slow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I appreciate the answers and advice! As far as the 250 advice I would be on board but they don't make a 250 with a DCT as far as I have been able to find and due to my medical issues on my left hand I can't use a clutch correctly. Thanks for the advice on rain mode and your perspective as well mTrider75.
 

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I think there is a lot of good advice that longbeachgary is giving, If you are gonna love motorcycling the 1100 ought to be considered, after all the practice and if motorcycling is gonna be your thing then you have a great bike to do it on.
If on the other hand it turns out motorcycling isn't for you then you have a bike that will be easy to sell.
My first pistol was a .357 magnum. ( I do shoot .38s in it ). Some felt I should have started with a . 22. I don't regret starting with the big gun. it really made me focus on respecting the shooting sports. I have since added others to my collection.
 

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I have just two words for you if you’re going to learn to ride on a 1100 DCT: rain mode. It reduces the power and throttle response, making it very difficult to give it too much juice. Then all you need to worry about is the size and weight, though it is still a relatively light bike for a cruiser. As has been noted already, find an empty parking lot and spend lots of time doing low-speed maneuvers. Get familiar and comfortable with how the automatic clutch behaves, particularly moving slowly from a dead stop. Also, read up on and practice trail braking - it will become very useful with the DCT at low speeds. Do a lot of start-stops, slow tight turns and figure 8’s. Low speed maneuvers will likely feel a bit awkward and unstable at first, but they will get more comfortable the more you do them.
 

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Rain mode as mentioned, big parking lot, lots of slow speed practice. The DCT is touchy to new riders going slow. Experienced riders do well but only after getting some practice in going slow to build confidence in the technology. Lots to think about spending that kind of money and not know if you can learn to go slow and pass a test.

Before buying, have you looked at cheap scooters with twist and go motoring. Rent if possible. Get an idea of how automatic throttle work at slow speeds.

Bikes with clutches are not all equal as to how much force it takes to pull in a clutch. A very light pull might work better for your hands. Warm gloves are great for my arthritis hands too. I have 2 bikes that I made clutch pull much less and always have gloves on. Not saying that it will work for you but maybe it could get you past the testing part without buying a bike you may not be sure about.

Good luck with whatever you end up trying and hope you pass with ease.
 

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2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT and 2012 Yamaha FZ8
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I agree with the other replies here. Rain mode reduces the power and throttle response. The biggest issue I have with new riders, or even experienced riders with no dct experience, starting out on the dct 1100 is that the rear wheel always has power when you touch the throttle. Meaning, if you slip and bump the throttle, your moving... possibly into traffic. So- practice a lot. I also suggest getting some sort of protection- engine guards, sliders, whatever, just in case you drop it.

Oh, one last thing- check all the controls to make sure they're comfortable and easy to manipulate. It's no good if you have to pull your hand back to hit the rear brake, possibly rolling onto the throttle, or if you can't reach far enough to turn the bars enough and end up twisting the throttle. Throttle manipulation is key on this bike. You may need to rotate the bars, get risers etc. If you have a friend more familiar with what I'm talking about, it may be best to bring them when looking at the bike.

Good luck with whatever you choose. The 1100 dct is a great bike, but imo not beginner friendly- even though people have done it.
 

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'21 Rebel 1100, '15 CTX 700
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My recommendation would be to find a used scooter in the 150 cc range. Scooters don't use a clutch, but require a motorcycle license, so are fine for the test. In addition they're light weight, easy to maneuver, and a good intro to the two wheeled world. Another option in the DCT arena would be a used Honda CTX 700.
 

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My recommendation would be to find a used scooter in the 150 cc range. Scooters don't use a clutch, but require a motorcycle license, so are fine for the test. In addition they're light weight, easy to maneuver, and a good intro to the two wheeled world. Another option in the DCT arena would be a used Honda CTX 700.
The NC750X also comes in DCT, I had one it's not too over powered, takes a little getting used to the DCT but not long.
 

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I appreciate the answers and advice! As far as the 250 advice I would be on board but they don't make a 250 with a DCT as far as I have been able to find and due to my medical issues on my left hand I can't use a clutch correctly. Thanks for the advice on rain mode and your perspective as well mTrider75.
check the suzuki burgman 200 or 400
 

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While I don't think I would recommend starting on a thousand pound touring Bike .. I think the Rebel would be a fine starting bike as long as use some common sense and respect it's power and take your time learning and as mentioned, PRACTICE .. I started on a 1969 XLCH Ironhead which everyone had me dead within 2 weeks .. this picture was taken 52 years ago ..


Tire Wheel Land vehicle Vehicle Automotive lighting
 

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I have been out of Cycles for over 30 years and at 66 and retired in NW Arkansas, I went for the 1100 DCT. No. 1, no clutching, #2, I won't have to worry about upgrades later. It CAN be that forever bike. But, I wholeheartedly agree with the others, "Rain Mode" on this is wonderful and can be used for training. Have used it for riding around in a full retirement area, so lots of hard turns and low & deep cult-da sacs. But NOTHING compares with wisdom and smarts, keep the speed UNDER what you consider manageable, no drinking, no drugs and your mind must be 100% on what you are doing. Just figure that the other guy is going to do something stupid??!! :=) AND, I don't ride on windy days, rainy days etc. Have learned that a little chicken little is good...
 
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