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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 500. After driving it off the lot and getting home I noticed when I hit the kill switch but the key still on my oil light came on. My buddy has a 300 and his does not do that. I text the salesman and asked him about it and he told me that as long as it's not on when the engin is running then I shouldn't have a problem. But every time I turn my key on that oil light is shining like the devil is winking at me. Lol. Anyone else have this problem. Though maybe this feature is for when oil is low or it's time for an oil change and maybe I could just reset it. Bike has 90 miles and oils level looks good.
 

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Yeah, what Kenny said.

Besides... You're not actually supposed to use the kill switch to turn off the bike anyway!
Use the key like you're supposed to, and tada, no more oil light to scare you anymore!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
so Kenny and Lyoko, do your bikes do this? lyoko, what is the kill switch for than? at the motorcycle training i took a few years back, it was taught to use the kill switch to turn off the bike. also if you do a search online to see what its for, it says most courses will tell you to use it to kill the engine. i usually just put the kick stand down while its in gear to shut it off.
 

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Dubb,

My engine oil light is on whenever the ignition key is in the on position and the engine is not running, as soon as the engine starts the light turns off.

I too use the kick stand to kill the engine, I am little lazy. I do always park with the bike in 1st. gear. With the clutch handle and the key both on the left hand side I find it difficult to turn the key off with the engine running and in gear.

Kenny G
 

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so Kenny and Lyoko, do your bikes do this? lyoko, what is the kill switch for than? at the motorcycle training i took a few years back, it was taught to use the kill switch to turn off the bike. also if you do a search online to see what its for, it says most courses will tell you to use it to kill the engine. i usually just put the kick stand down while its in gear to shut it off.
Every single Rebel will do that, and just about any other bike out there too...
Have you stopped and examined the word used for that switch, like, ever..? Kill, switch, kill-switch, what does "kill" mean, what does "switch" means, and what's the message here when you combine the two?!
Oh I know! It's a switch! And that switch kill's the bike! Made to be used in a state of emergency where you "literally" kill the bike, because hey, it is YOUR bike after all, can't have it missbehaving and riding off without you now, can you?
But from "joke" to seriousness, many tend to forget that the ignition key is still in the "on" position in the bike when they stop it with the kill switch, meaning the power will still be on, and thus draining your battery. So by all means, use it all you want, but it is a bad habit to make. But to each their own I suppose.
 

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so Kenny and Lyoko, do your bikes do this? lyoko, what is the kill switch for than? at the motorcycle training i took a few years back, it was taught to use the kill switch to turn off the bike. also if you do a search online to see what its for, it says most courses will tell you to use it to kill the engine. i usually just put the kick stand down while its in gear to shut it off.
My wife and I were taught to use the kill switch when turning off the bike at our Motorcycle Safety Course this summer. Can anyone with mechanical knowledge shed some light on whether this is bad for the bike or not?
 

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Perhaps they teach to use the kill switch because you can turn off the bike without removing your hands from the handlebars. Using your right hand to turn the key wouldn't be a problem but the left hand could cause an issue if the bike is in gear.

Does it harm the bike to use the kill switch? No. You might kill your battery if you forget to also turn off the key after the kill switch.
 

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Perhaps they teach to use the kill switch because you can turn off the bike without removing your hands from the handlebars. Using your right hand to turn the key wouldn't be a problem but the left hand could cause an issue if the bike is in gear.

Does it harm the bike to use the kill switch? No. You might kill your battery if you forget to also turn off the key after the kill switch.
What he said. Jesus people, just read what I'm writing and trying to tell you guys... *sigh*
 

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Perhaps they teach to use the kill switch because you can turn off the bike without removing your hands from the handlebars. Using your right hand to turn the key wouldn't be a problem but the left hand could cause an issue if the bike is in gear.

Does it harm the bike to use the kill switch? No. You might kill your battery if you forget to also turn off the key after the kill switch.
Thanks, 01. They did stress to remember to turn the ignition off afterwards. Easier to turn off with your right hand is probably one of the reasons they taught us this. The other, they mentioned that the kill switch or wire may become corroded or loose or something over time and it may not be there when you need it in an emergency.
 

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Thanks, 01. They did stress to remember to turn the ignition off afterwards. Easier to turn off with your right hand is probably one of the reasons they taught us this. The other, they mentioned that the kill switch or wire may become corroded or loose or something over time and it may not be there when you need it in an emergency.
And another reason - if you get in the habit of using it then you will remember that you have one and can use it in an emergency situation - we sometimes don't think well under stress.
 

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And another reason - if you get in the habit of using it then you will remember that you have one and can use it in an emergency situation - we sometimes don't think well under stress.
Well, if the Rebel ever goes over while the engine is running, it will kill it by itself, without you having to do anything. It has a sensor that reacts when the bike is laid over too much, and thus kills it.
So, kinda makes you wounder why it even has a kill switch.
But yes, sometimes it could ease the burden of parking in a slope by giving you an easy way of killing the engine.
 

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Well, if the Rebel ever goes over while the engine is running, it will kill it by itself, without you having to do anything. It has a sensor that reacts when the bike is laid over too much, and thus kills it.
So, kinda makes you wounder why it even has a kill switch.
Maybe the kill switch is an emergency shut-off thing in case the throttle gets stuck wide open or something, or some other situation where you can't get to the ignition key. As for the oil light mentioned earlier in this thread, it's like the oil light in cars that don't have an oil pressure gauge; it illuminates if you lose engine oil pressure. For the guy whose friend's bike didn't have the oil light on with the key on engine off, I'd get that checked out because it should be on any time you have a KOEO situation. Otherwise, you could lose oil pressure while riding and never know about it until your engine seized due to lack of lubrication.
 

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I use the kill switch often, usually when first starting the bike or parking & leaving it.
Not sure about all bikes, but the Rebels lights & Speedo are still illuminated by only using the kill switch to off, so it’s a no brainier to turn off using the key.

Good to know the mystery is solved as per the video.
 

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The kill switch on a motorcycle is no different to the same type of switch in other applications.

As indicated by the name, the function is to kill the engine, instantaneously.

In the old days, speedway riders used an old set of contact points mounted on the handlebar near the throttle. It was connected to the ignition coil and held open by a small tag of leather which was connected to the riders wrist by a cord.

In the event that a rider came off at full speed, the tag would pull from between the contacts which would short the ignition and kill the engine, preventing an uncontrolled bike from driving into the crowd.

Many machinery systems have kill switches that shut down the machine in an instant, sometimes even damaging the machine.
They are highly visible and easily accessed so that anybody can kill a machine in an emergency.
The primary intent is to stop the machinery in the event of human danger.

The US DOT required all motorcycles sold in the US to be fitted with a readily accessible kill switch, I think this came into being in the early 1970s.

The primary reason for the kill switch at that time was no different to the speedway riders or the machinery systems.
It was to kill the engine in the event of an emergency such as a stuck throttle cable, snapped clutch cable or accident.

Our Rebel manual instruction states:

ENGINE STOP SWITCH
Should normally remain in the (Run) position.
In an emergency, switch to the X (Off) position (the starter motor will not operate) to stop the engine.

So according to the manual, if it's not an emergency, don't use it.

Whether you use the kill switch to shut your bike off, or the ignition key, or the side stand, it's a matter of choice (IMO). Just have a "shut down routine" whichever way you use.

Of course if you were a real showoff, you could just pull up outside the bar and simply drop your bike on the ground and let the lean angle sensor do all the work for you.
<joke of course>
 

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Just did the MSF course 3 weeks ago and we were told to use the kill switch.
I even asked about leaving the key on and eating the battery and they said yes it will eat the battery if you leave the key but its kill switch THEN key off ... and thats how we did it... Since the Rebel key is on the side of the bike I just use the kill switch then do the key... but I can tell you its very annoying when you forget to turn the kill switch back on and think the bike wont start.... so always check the kill switch first if your bike wont start....
 

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Just did the MSF course 3 weeks ago and we were told to use the kill switch..........
I think they do that as a safety thing for new riders.

I've seen a couple of riders back in the old days, accidentally drop the clutch as they were shutting down and the bike lurched forward before stalling.

I even know somebody who did that and dropped his brand new Honda 750 Four. :crying:
 
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