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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I just bought a new Rebel 300 (white) with ABS as my first motorcycle. I'm in Brampton, Ontario, Canada. Excited to get the show on the road, although I must say, I'm quite nervous about riding in the Greater Toronto Area. Not the ideal place to ride for a beginner. I think I'll stick to the few country roads north of the city to begin with. Would welcome and appreciate any advice for a first timer.
 

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First of all? Canada has the ABS model in WHITE?? It's still only available in black in the US. That's poopoo!

OK, assuming you've taken some sort of safety course and have all your safety gear, my biggest advice for the twisty rural roads is two words, Awareness and Patience.
1. Only go as fast as you can see. If there's a hill you can't see over or a curve you can't see around, reduce your speed. Related to this, your line depends on the turn. In a right hander that you can't see around, be in the left tire lane. In a left hander, be to the right. This increases your view of what's coming.
2. Look through the turn. Don't focus on what's three feet in front of you. You should have already seen that if you're looking properly through your turn.
3. As you can tell so far, your biggest asset while riding is your eyes and their connection to your brain. Rural roads are great, but you have to stay alert. There are things that happen more quickly than you thought. Grass clipping and gravel on the road. These are super dangerous in the turns. Also, freaking tractors! I've also met trash collectors, school buses, and mail carriers. Oh and animals: deer, dogs, bicycle riders :), etc. Be aware! I also like to spot check the oncoming drivers. Are their eyes down? Cell phone drifters, I call them.
4. How to get through your very first turns. Seriously, this sounds boring but remember this: "Slow in, fast out". Believe it or not, it's fun as **** on a Rebel. They're made for this. And, good news, it's safer too. Brake BEFORE you get to the turn, not in the turn. Even if it feels slow at first, do it. This will keep you out of trouble. You can always build up your speed as you gain confidence in your bike and yourself.
Here's what I mean. You're a complete newb riding a 50 mph road and see a sign for a lazy long left-hand 30 mph turn. Your first one ever. Give yourself plenty of time to slow to 30 or even 25 before you get to the turn. Don't forget to drop down a gear. Now you're in the turn, leaning slightly. If you feel yourself drifting, If you find yourself in too hot, don't panic and cut off the throttle or yank on the brakes. Trust me, you can lean a bit further. Your bike can handle it easily. Don't look at that SUV on the other side of the road either, you should be looking through your turn! When you reach about halfway through the turn, slowly roll on the throttle. This is the fun part. This plants the bike. As you come out of the corner you can throttle even more and your bike will stand back up and you'll feel and look cool. But slow. But that's okay, because you're being patient, right?
Do this until you feel more comfy. Then you can start rolling onto the throttle earlier. Stay smooth on it though. Eventually, you'll end up with a touch of throttle right after corner entry. Again, this settles the bike. After a while, you'll get the hang of what speed to slow to also. If you have those signs that give you a recommended speed through the turn, great. Just don't forget to not go any faster than you can see! Awareness + Patience, remember?
And don't worry about traffic behind you. Ride your ride. You can always wave them around on a straight, or pull off and let them by.
5. If you find yourself running over the yellow line, you should probably take a water break (or at least slow TF down) and think pretty carefully about what you could have improved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
First of all? Canada has the ABS model in WHITE?? It's still only available in black in the US. That's poopoo!

OK, assuming you've taken some sort of safety course and have all your safety gear, my biggest advice for the twisty rural roads is two words, Awareness and Patience.
1. Only go as fast as you can see. If there's a hill you can't see over or a curve you can't see around, reduce your speed. Related to this, your line depends on the turn. In a right hander that you can't see around, be in the left tire lane. In a left hander, be to the right. This increases your view of what's coming.
2. Look through the turn. Don't focus on what's three feet in front of you. You should have already seen that if you're looking properly through your turn.
3. As you can tell so far, your biggest asset while riding is your eyes and their connection to your brain. Rural roads are great, but you have to stay alert. There are things that happen more quickly than you thought. Grass clipping and gravel on the road. These are super dangerous in the turns. Also, freaking tractors! I've also met trash collectors, school buses, and mail carriers. Oh and animals: deer, dogs, bicycle riders :), etc. Be aware! I also like to spot check the oncoming drivers. Are their eyes down? Cell phone drifters, I call them.
4. How to get through your very first turns. Seriously, this sounds boring but remember this: "Slow in, fast out". Believe it or not, it's fun as **** on a Rebel. They're made for this. And, good news, it's safer too. Brake BEFORE you get to the turn, not in the turn. Even if it feels slow at first, do it. This will keep you out of trouble. You can always build up your speed as you gain confidence in your bike and yourself.
Here's what I mean. You're a complete newb riding a 50 mph road and see a sign for a lazy long left-hand 30 mph turn. Your first one ever. Give yourself plenty of time to slow to 30 or even 25 before you get to the turn. Don't forget to drop down a gear. Now you're in the turn, leaning slightly. If you feel yourself drifting, If you find yourself in too hot, don't panic and cut off the throttle or yank on the brakes. Trust me, you can lean a bit further. Your bike can handle it easily. Don't look at that SUV on the other side of the road either, you should be looking through your turn! When you reach about halfway through the turn, slowly roll on the throttle. This is the fun part. This plants the bike. As you come out of the corner you can throttle even more and your bike will stand back up and you'll feel and look cool. But slow. But that's okay, because you're being patient, right?
Do this until you feel more comfy. Then you can start rolling onto the throttle earlier. Stay smooth on it though. Eventually, you'll end up with a touch of throttle right after corner entry. Again, this settles the bike. After a while, you'll get the hang of what speed to slow to also. If you have those signs that give you a recommended speed through the turn, great. Just don't forget to not go any faster than you can see! Awareness + Patience, remember?
And don't worry about traffic behind you. Ride your ride. You can always wave them around on a straight, or pull off and let them by.
5. If you find yourself running over the yellow line, you should probably take a water break (or at least slow TF down) and think pretty carefully about what you could have improved.
Thank you kindly for all of this information. I did the Safety course here as well. My main issue in that was the instructor said I wasn't leaning enough and not trusting the bike. Also, looking down was also a major concern for me. I barely passed it so that's making me more nervous, but I appreciate the help. I think all of these are great. I'm a defensive driver (car) as well so I think that will help me on a motorcycle.
 

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Thank you kindly for all of this information. I did the Safety course here as well. My main issue in that was the instructor said I wasn't leaning enough and not trusting the bike. Also, looking down was also a major concern for me. I barely passed it so that's making me more nervous, but I appreciate the help. I think all of these are great. I'm a defensive driver (car) as well so I think that will help me on a motorcycle.
Can I give one more suggestion then? Maybe first find the largest empty parking you can: a megachurch, an arena, a high school or college, etc. Practice there. This isn't those slow turns that you did in the safety course. This is faster. Get into 2nd gear and turn. Take your time, but just lean a little more each time. If you have enough room, you should be able to get some speed. In a big parking lot, if you go wide, at least you're not off the road or into oncoming traffic.
Practice there first until you feel confident. And realize that if your pegs aren't touching the ground, then the bike is fine! I'm not saying practice until you're scraping your footpegs, I'm saying that you can trust your motorcycle. Patience. You can do this.
Feel free to ask anything on here or even PM me if you want.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Can I give one more suggestion then? Maybe first find the largest empty parking you can: a megachurch, an arena, a high school or college, etc. Practice there. This isn't those slow turns that you did in the safety course. This is faster. Get into 2nd gear and turn. Take your time, but just lean a little more each time. If you have enough room, you should be able to get some speed. In a big parking lot, if you go wide, at least you're not off the road or into oncoming traffic.
Practice there first until you feel confident. And realize that if your pegs aren't touching the ground, then the bike is fine! I'm not saying practice until you're scraping your footpegs, I'm saying that you can trust your motorcycle. Patience. You can do this.
Feel free to ask anything on here or even PM me if you want.
Yeah, I was planning on doing that before hitting the roads. Just seems like a good idea, if for nothing then to simply get used to the clutch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
First of all? Canada has the ABS model in WHITE?? It's still only available in black in the US. That's poopoo!
Also, P.S. I guess the grass is always greener because we don't have the 300 abs in black and that was my preferred first choice (although white was a close second). We have the red and the white only for the 300 abs models.
 

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Also, P.S. I guess the grass is always greener because we don't have the 300 abs in black and that was my preferred first choice (although white was a close second). We have the red and the white only for the 300 abs models.
Ha! That's funny. I wish we could trade tanks!

Be safe and have fun!
 
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