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I currently ride a rebel 500 and get 47 mpg at average speeds of 75-80 on a 44 mile daily commute.

If I were to get a bigger motorcycle(say the 1100) and run it the sane way, would my fuel economy go down due to the bike weighing more + bigger engine? Or would I get better economy because the 1100 isn’t working as hard? Assume non-DCT for the bigger bike, because I think DCT optimizes fuel economy
 

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I currently ride a rebel 500 and get 47 mpg at average speeds of 75-80 on a 44 mile daily commute.

If I were to get a bigger motorcycle(say the 1100) and run it the sane way, would my fuel economy go down due to the bike weighing more + bigger engine? Or would I get better economy because the 1100 isn’t working as hard? Assume non-DCT for the bigger bike, because I think DCT optimizes fuel economy
No the DCT does not optimize fuel economy. All the gear ratios are different to handle the dual clutch and computer programming much like a car that has an automatic vs the same model with a manual transmission. Honda most likely has to compete on the market with power and miles per gallon so probably optimizes all models to meet their desired numbers. They both have 6 gears and both can be shifted in manual mode so MPG will on both models depend on one's riding style. I always ride in manual mode and shift with my fingers instead of my foot. I have gotten 54mpg often but that was keeping it around 55 or under.

Bigger (heavier with more power) is easier to ride due to weight making it less apt to be blown around by wind, cars and trucks. Also passing will be faster from 60-90 on the 1100. The 1100 engine is not working very hard at 80mph.
 

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larger bore engines use more fuel per stroke sitting at stop light, no way around that, mpg is mostly governed by wrist torque
 

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No the DCT does not optimize fuel economy. All the gear ratios are different to handle the dual clutch and computer programming much like a car that has an automatic vs the same model with a manual transmission. Honda most likely has to compete on the market with power and miles per gallon so probably optimizes all models to meet their desired numbers. They both have 6 gears and both can be shifted in manual mode so MPG will on both models depend on one's riding style. I always ride in manual mode and shift with my fingers instead of my foot. I have gotten 54mpg often but that was keeping it around 55 or under.

Bigger (heavier with more power) is easier to ride due to weight making it less apt to be blown around by wind, cars and trucks. Also passing will be faster from 60-90 on the 1100. The 1100 engine is not working very hard at 80mph.
I have tried experimenting with different octane levels and 89 octane gives me the best bang for the buck. I have only 2,500 miles on my Rebel 1100DCT.
 

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Higher octane is used solely to reduce the combustibility of gasoline. High compression engines produce more power. But the high compression also causes the gas to detonate too early. That's why they "ping" if you use low octane. It's the gas exploding too early and pushing the piston backwards, same as when you set the timing too early. Therefore, they get worse gas mileage, not better. Rebel 1100s are okay on 87 octane.
 

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I have tried experimenting with different octane levels and 89 octane gives me the best bang for the buck. I have only 2,500 miles on my Rebel 1100DCT.

Great you can enjoy your 1100DCT the best with 89 octane. I sure like mine 1100 DCT. The question of different octane level gets batted about on every forum I have been on. I think (and many others) that one should always use whatever gas they wish.

My lifelong experience with old and modern motorcycles with knock sensors and computerized fuel and timing controls handle just about any kind of gas I have used. I only run regular. Best bang for me for my bucks. My first ECU bike was a 2014 FZ-09 3 cylinder rocket ship Yamaha. Seemed to run on most any regular even though manual called for premium.

My 2 present bikes, the 1100 DCT with 9800 miles simply goes when I twist the throttle so that's all I want out of my motorcycles. Fuel economy not much of a concern since I usually get 150 miles before fueling. I do watch the RANGE numbers when riding. My pristine classic Hawk 650GT hits the redline at 8500 rpms on regular any time I have wanted for the last 8 years. Very happy with my gas dollars with both bikes.
 
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