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Discussion Starter #1
I am not seeing a tachometer on the rebel. Is that an issue for anyone? At least on a manual car, I would use the tach to help me shift at correct times.
 

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You're not seeing one, as there isn't one.
Is it an issue? No? Why would it be?
Try once to drive your car without looking at the rpm gauge, and see what happens. (I'll give you a hint: When the car is screaming at you, and maybe some smoke is coming out from under the hood, it's time to change gears!)
But seriously, listen to your bike, to your car, listen to what it's telling you. Is it screaming? Change to higher gear. Are you driving up a hill and you can hear the engine struggling? Change down a gear.
You'll notice all sorts of things that your vehicle is telling you, through sounds, through feelings in the stearing, in the body, how the power is responding and behaving, etc, etc.

And I can't help ponder over "I would use the tach to help me shift at correct times"
How does that work even? That's the kind of thing you'd do when you're listening to the engine.
There is no fixed law that says that you have to change gears when you're at the max rpm, or that you have to change down when you're at X rpm.
You should really start driving solely by what you're feeling, and not be fixated by the numbers.
Should follow the speed limit and such thou, ofc :p
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I hear you. I haven't driven a manual in a while, but you are probably right that I wasn't shifting based on the RPM when I did. However, I do have a friend who managed to accidentally stick his saab into 3rd instead of 5th on the highway and not notice it for quite some time due to open windows, loud music and a car full of loud people.
Also, when just starting out I feel that being able to see the RPM would help learn what the bike sounds like at the point where you should shift.
Anyways, I guess it's not an issue and I am just wondering why would honda decide to omit it, since most bikes do have them and it's not a terribly expensive piece of equipment.
 

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I hear you. I haven't driven a manual in a while, but you are probably right that I wasn't shifting based on the RPM when I did. However, I do have a friend who managed to accidentally stick his saab into 3rd instead of 5th on the highway and not notice it for quite some time due to open windows, loud music and a car full of loud people.
Also, when just starting out I feel that being able to see the RPM would help learn what the bike sounds like at the point where you should shift.
Anyways, I guess it's not an issue and I am just wondering why would honda decide to omit it, since most bikes do have them and it's not a terribly expensive piece of equipment.
Well, in such circumstances I'm sure even the most experienced driver would struggle a little...
But thankfully that ain't an everyday situation that we find our self in, unless you're a taxi driver perhaps...

I'll say to you what I said to another one here complaining about the same, the Rebel isn't supposed to have it! It's that simple!
The Rebel was made with the word "bobber" in mind, both in styling and function.
When was the last time you saw a bobber with an rpm gauge? Or a gear indicator?
The Rebel is an retro idea of a bike, with a modern twist to it.

And again with the numbers.. Trust me, when the bike want's to change gear, you'll notice!!
If you go out one day and simply try applying throttle until the bike simply can't go any faster in that gear, then you'll know. And believe me, you'll be wanting to change long before the bike can't go any faster, because of the sound it'll be making. You really can't mistake the sound from an engine that is screaming at you between your legs... You've gotta be deaf in that case!
When you start getting some experience on two wheels, you'll eventually get used to only relying on the sound from the bike, and not the gimmicks telling you the rpm, or what gear you're in.
To begin with it might be a little steep learning curve, but you'll gain way more experience by starting out like that, instead of relying on gimmicks.
So don't let if throw you off the saddle before you've started riding even.:wink2:
 

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If your a new rider, what you don’t have you don’t need.
Some riders only want a tacho because other bikes have them. Using the bike often will soon teach you the correct times to change up or down, you begin to automatically memorise the gear select time without much thinking.

I’ve had several fast cars, always played loud music but never had to look a the tacho when using gears, you learn the feel of your own bike/car.
 

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I've always rode dirtbikes/ fourwheelers, none of which have a tach.. most new fourwheelers have a gear indicator but since I grew up riding without one I seldom even pay it any attention. You'll feel it more than hear it I always say. And when shifting into 3rd instead of 5th in a car, that's a matter of hitting the wrong slot in the shifter.. it would be almost impossible to pull that off on a bike as you have to actually click straight up or down.
 

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This is one of the times that a tach would be useful - when you can't hear your own bike over the music. WARNING - language not safe for little kids or work.

 

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We just got our 300s about a month ago and don't miss a tach. The absolute biggest exclamation point in my MSF class was don't look down. Beginners don't need an incentive to create a bad habit.
 

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Several bikes I have owned had tachs. My F6c has one. I think I prefer the tach. I find that I use it while I learn the feel of the bike then forget about it. On the Rebel I have no idea what the rpms are at my shift points and for me that means I may not be taking full advantage of the bike. I may get a cheap inductive tach just to know how much or little I’m abusing it. I would also like to know what the rpms are when the limiter kicks in. Combined it would make my riding experience better.
 

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I’ve had my Rebel 500 for three weeks or so. It’s my first bike.

I like that I can’t look at a tachometer because a) I should be looking ahead of me rather than at an instrument panel (especially when downshifting for a turn up ahead), and b) it’s teaching me to listen to my bike and get to know it.

The only time I’ve felt a tachometer would be helpful is when downshifting while approaching a Give Way (Yeild) sign or intersection. Once or twice I’ve thought I was shifting down into second when actually I was already in second, so I ended up shifting down into first while still moving. I reckon I’ll just get used to it.

I do have a lot of experience driving a manual car, so maybe that has helped.
 

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My view is bikes have gauges for a reason. I don’t stare at them I glance at them. They provide beneficial information for me. I’ve been on 2 wheels for 45 years now. I know how to listen, feel, and shift. What I don’t know is this bikes RPM’s. Now I do. I went to Honda today to complain about a 1st to Second gear vibration in the bars. The svc manager test rode it and remarked that it was smoother than any on the sales floor. Good mods I guess. He told me the redline for this motor on the CBR500 is 8500 and the rev limiter kicks in around 8700 rpms. With this new to me info I joined the CBR500 Forum. Here is a picture of a post. I caution you to understand this info is for the CBR500 not the CMX500. They have the same motor but may have weight, tire size and sprocket size differences. What it does for me is gives me shift point speeds to listen ,feel, and learn. I want to keep my shifting in the 4K rpm range so it looks like I will try 1st to 2nd around 20mph. 2nd to 3rd at 30, 3rd to 4th at 40 and the last 2 gears when I want to cruise in light to no traffic. Again it’s the info I was looking for so i could match speed to rpms and decide for myself where my shift points will be to minimize vibration and not abuse the motor. Last comment is when the svc manager told me I was going too easy I decided to get a little more aggressive on the way home and didn’t notice vibration.
 

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Here is a picture of a post. I caution you to understand this info is for the CBR500 not the CMX500 ... Last comment is when the svc manager told me I was going too easy I decided to get a little more aggressive on the way home and didn’t notice vibration.
Really interesting table, thanks! And I think I’ve felt the vibration you mention as well.
 

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I got to test my shift points. If I shift on the 7s I avoid vibration and am clearly in the 4K rpm range. My shift points are at 17, 27, 37 for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd. After that I shift into 4th around 45 but use it anywhere in the 40s and 5th anywhere in the 50s. 6th would only be interstate for me. I’ll have these down in a couple of rides. The bike just got better now that have an idea of the rpms. On the road above 35mph its extreeemly smooth.
 

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No legitimate reason

You're not seeing one, as there isn't one.
Is it an issue? No? Why would it be?
Try once to drive your car without looking at the rpm gauge, and see what happens. (I'll give you a hint: When the car is screaming at you, and maybe some smoke is coming out from under the hood, it's time to change gears!)
But seriously, listen to your bike, to your car, listen to what it's telling you. Is it screaming? Change to higher gear. Are you driving up a hill and you can hear the engine struggling? Change down a gear.
You'll notice all sorts of things that your vehicle is telling you, through sounds, through feelings in the stearing, in the body, how the power is responding and behaving, etc, etc.

And I can't help ponder over "I would use the tach to help me shift at correct times"
How does that work even? That's the kind of thing you'd do when you're listening to the engine.
There is no fixed law that says that you have to change gears when you're at the max rpm, or that you have to change down when you're at X rpm.
You should really start driving solely by what you're feeling, and not be fixated by the numbers.
Should follow the speed limit and such thou, ofc :p

There's plenty of reasons why a tacho is useful - which is why 95% of road bikes and 99% of cars, and 100% track versions of both have them. Short-shifting because of the type of fuel available, run-in period, post-servicing requirements, when you can't hear the engine (either because you're in a loud environment like a track/next to an airport/are actually deaf), when you're lazy, when you're a new rider, because you want to save on gas, you may have a pillion, the bike might have a problem, etc etc. So many good and valid reasons.

Suggesting that it doesn't need one, must mean it's unnecessary on all those other bikes with them. Even Harely's with all that torque (which is an argument that it's slightly less necessary for that type of bike) now are putting them on.
The short answer is, Honda was saving a buck here.
 

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I have not always had a tacho on my bikes. But having one is helpful. Feeling is something to get used to certainly. That is important. But I would like to know what I am feeling. Is a bike sceaming a bit because it is doing 4,500 revs or because it is pushing on to 6,000. Who knows? I asked Honda UK what the gearing was for each gear (mph per 1,000 revs for each gear). But they said they did not know! (What?!) That information would be enough for me. That said, you can get along nicely without a tacho if you have to.

Anyway, bobber or not, I have ordered a gear indicator. They are really useful to me. Of course, again, you can manage without one.
 

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I bought my 300 in late September....my first motorcycle. But I have been driving standard trans cars since the 70's...and only one of them (current one) has ever had a tach. You learn to feel the car. (or motorcycle) Feel the vibrations, listen to the engine, understand how the car feels when you press the accelerator in at different levels. And understand how fast you're going vs what gear you're in. With a car, you get to visually see where the gear shift is, so you don't have to remember what gear you're in. ( or if you forget) But with a motorcycle, you have to remember what gear you're in. It's the cost of admission.
 
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