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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
;I have never done any of this stuff before so I don't know the vocabulary or the results of changing things, I need my grips at least 4 inches closer to the seat, I understand there are things I can add to the top of the bike just below the instrument panel and it will cause the bars to closer. the way I see it , if something gets the instrument panel taller, and the forks are angled back it will make the bars closer to me, also it appears that the bars are bent in a way if I loosened that part that clamps them to the forks I can rotate them some and get the grips closer to me , then reposition all the junk that is on them, I dunno about the throttle itself since it is electric and not cable ,
any advice will be greatly appreciated and mulled over thoughtully whilst consuming a refreshing beverage
Idid watch the video and it was highly helpful but I don't know how much it moved back, what the parts are I need to orderand who to order them from and if more could be gotten by rotating the bars, I am one short armed dude
 

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"Handlebar risers" are what you are looking for. I have them on my 500 but they don't help as much as they would seem to. You also have the extra joy of whether the cable will all reach the new position, I had to buy a 6 inch extension for my front brake cable.
There's a lot of knowledge here, nearly all of us are here to help ( I flop back and forth between helpful and troll ).
 

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2021 Honda CMX 1100 DCT
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My 1100 came (used) with 3" Rox bar risers 3" Pivoting Bar Risers for V-Twin Bikes (Extended Stem) and a instrument cluster re-location kit. It works...but but it's messy. All the wiring from the controls (brake, DCT, lights) had to be detached from the handlebars and the front brake hose had to be rerouted around the fork tubes - all to allow the bars to be moved that far back. I made some changes to the bar height and control area angle, so I became pretty familiar with this set up. This is not a good beginner job. If you're set on 3" risers, I'd recommend finding a capable motorcycle mechanic or Honda dealer to install them. While no individual task is difficult, there's a lot of ways to screw things up. For starters, it's easy to dent the gas tank dropping the handlebars, or by having the risers hit the tank in a full lock turn because you didn't think to check for that when doing the installation. More important, if you've never worked on motorcycle master cylinders and hoses, moving that hose could be dangerous.
ROX sells 2 inch bar risers with the cluster relocation kit that fits the 1100 without a problem. 2" Pivoting riser kit for the Honda Rebel 1100 That's a job a beginner can do - and there are videos on YouTube to guide him.
I'd suggest trying that first and if you still need the handlebars closer, consider switching to narrower handlebars -- with more sweep (also called pullback - because the ends of the bars are pulled back - toward the rider, further than the stock bars). The diameter of Rebel bars taper in size from 7/8" (22mm) at the grips/control areas to 1" (25mm) in the middle and on the up-sweep sections -- which isn't a common configuration. Consult with a Honda or accessory dealer to find out if any such bars are available.
Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
can I determine the amount of distance I will get with 3 inch risers by adding an inch to what I get with 2 inch risers? my ultimate goal is to have a seating position like my burgman which has a huge amount of pullback (used a new vocabulary word today, I get a refreshing beverage for that !) enough so that I actually lean back instead of sit up straigt or lean forward
rox risers say inch and a half up and inch and a half back, I saw a video of the tilty kind that appeared to not use so much up as it did back, and suggested that no brake line relocation was necessary but did not say how far back they moved I'm thinkin if I don't use my brake line length for going up, I can use it for going farther (further ? ) back
 

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can I determine the amount of distance I will get with 3 inch risers by adding an inch to what I get with 2 inch risers? my ultimate goal is to have a seating position like my burgman which has a huge amount of pullback (used a new vocabulary word today, I get a refreshing beverage for that !) enough so that I actually lean back instead of sit up straigt or lean forward
rox risers say inch and a half up and inch and a half back, I saw a video of the tilty kind that appeared to not use so much up as it did back, and suggested that no brake line relocation was necessary but did not say how far back they moved I'm thinkin if I don't use my brake line length for going up, I can use it for going farther (further ? ) back
I have a set of Kijima handlebars for sale that you may like. They actually had too much pullback for my preference. I'm 5'6" with short arms and putting my arms at full extension allowed me to lean back even while sitting at the rearmost edge of the seat. Even sitting perfectly upright allowed for a natural bend in my elbows. The brake lines and wiring have just enough slack for them so I didn't have to re-route anything and they come predrilled with holes for the throttle and switch housings.

The specs say they add 2" in pullback and about a half inch in rise but it feels like a lot more than that compared to the stock bars.

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So, can I combine this with a riser? cost and shipping?
 

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So, can I combine this with a riser? cost and shipping?
Theoretically you could but you would probably have to start rerouting the brake lines and wiring to get enough slack in them.

It looks like shipping costs from Japan have decreased lately but buying them new still brings the total to around $140 so I just lowered the price to $90 shipped. . Kijima Handlebars for the 1100
 

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2021 Honda CMX 1100 DCT
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can I determine the amount of distance I will get with 3 inch risers by adding an inch to what I get with 2 inch risers? Ans: I measured the ROX 3" risers and they actually move the bars 3 1/4". my ultimate goal is to have a seating position like my burgman Now we are getting somewhere. Open this link to a cycle ergonomics simulator: Motorcycle Ergonomics and add Suzuki Burgman (your cc's) as your first choice, then Rebel 1100 as your second choice. Add your Rider Information and you will see (stick figure) your position on each. Use Vehicle Customization on the Honda handlebar position to see how your position changes and compare it to your fit on the Burgman.
rox risers say inch and a half up and inch and a half back, Two reasons for that: 1. the risers rotate in the original bar mounts and as they move up (from horizontal) they move forward. (Think of a clock face and the position of the bars at 12 and at 3 o'clock.) 2. The Rebel gas tank does not allow the risers to be horizontal without making a huge dent on the top. On my ROX 3" risers, the bars are 1 1/2" higher than stock and roughly 3" back. I saw a video of the tilty kind that appeared to not use so much up as it did back, and suggested that no brake line relocation was necessary but did not say how far back they moved Measuring bar position/movement on the bike is really difficult because of all the crap interfering with your ruler/tape measure and getting a clean angle to view the ruler. I'm thinkin if I don't use my brake line length for going up, I can use it for going farther (further ? ) back Yes that's true but as Jon1100 mentions, if you use risers and handlebars, you will definitely need to re-route the brake line and might even need a longer E-brake cable (Africa Twin part?) and longer other electrical lines.
My recommendation: use the Cycle-Ergo site to see the effect of the Kajima bars on your riding position. If you can live with that, the Kajima bars are a much better choice than risers simply because they will not interfere with the gas tank and therefore should not need to be raised above factory Rebel height while still giving you 2" move pullback. If you absolutely need 4" of pullback, you can find (snowmobile?) risers and can use your stock handlebars.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My recommendation: use the Cycle-Ergo site to see the effect of the Kajima bars on your riding position. If you can live with that, the Kajima bars are a much better choice than risers simply because they will not interfere with the gas tank and therefore should not need to be raised above factory Rebel height while still giving you 2" move pullback. If you absolutely need 4" of pullback, you can find (snowmobile?) risers and can use your stock handlebars.
my hands came off and my back never went back past straight up:cautious:
 

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The only thing that changes in the Cycle-Ergo image, is the stick figure, not the handlebars or other bike parts. So, using 5 '7" as your height, this is what is shows for the Burgman:

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Automotive lighting Vehicle





and this is what it shows with a 4" pullback and 1 1/2" rise on the bars:

Tire Wheel Land vehicle Motorcycle Fuel tank


In both cases, you have 0* forward lean and very similar knee and hip angles. The main difference is the distance your hands have to extend from your body to reach the handlebars.
Moving the handlebars back to exactly match your position on a Burgman require adding a 10 inch riser (can you say "tiller") to the bike. With an 18" front tire (not 12"?) it would surely change how the bike steers and handles -- and not in a good way.

Tire Wheel Motorcycle Automotive tire Automotive lighting
 

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The Burgman seat has a lot more padding so sitting upright over bumps won't impact your spine like it would on a cruiser. Sitting slightly leaned forward with feet more under your center of mass would be less painful than a thinly padded seat in the long run. The Burgman seat also lets you move around a bit more so it's less cramping on long trips than a seat that cradles you in one position like a cruiser.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The Burgman seat has a lot more padding so sitting upright over bumps won't impact your spine like it would on a cruiser. Sitting slightly leaned forward with feet more under your center of mass would be less painful than a thinly padded seat in the long run. The Burgman seat also lets you move around a bit more so it's less cramping on long trips than a seat that cradles you in one position like a cruiser.
Yep it's comfy, and long enough I can move forward and my T rex (dinosaur) arms can bend and shoulders droop. (not to mention the dangly bits hang over the front in the cooling breeze)

I ordered JIS screwdrivers to move stuff around on the bars yesterday, now if I win the Florida Weather Lottery and my house is still standing next week I can do some tweaking on what I have.
 

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Good luck on personalizing your bike. I found that for myself that riser will help, I started with the Speed Seven risers 1 inch up and 1/2 back... not enough, then I tried the 2 inch Rox Risers, I did relocate the brake line behind the top triple clamp for this, Still not enough, the last and comfortable move for me was to put the speed seven on and then the
2 '" Rox Riser, I adjusted them more for rearward angle than to get the up rise.I did have to free the wiring up and relocate the clutch cable for this set up to work. The brake hose was as tight and straight as I was comfortable with. I didn't buy a relocation kit, I bought a couple of 8mm bolts and plastic ( Nylon) spacers at home depot ending up costing about $7-8 bucks I did have to cut down the short end of an allen wrench to fit the clamp bolts for the risers. when I lowered the risers back they reduce the space to get at the clamp bolt. I'm handy with tools and although it did seem like a lot of work, it was not hard work. the solution for you may be a combination of risers and bars the Kajima bars and a set of 2 ' Rox might be all you need. If you are going to have to pay some one to do this for you, you might consider the Burley Brand Mini apes and extended controls kit , it expensive but you should be able to do it your self.

I hope you find your happy place, after 13 months of modifying, customizing, and adapting or making parts to fit my Rebel, windshield, forward control foot peg relocators, installing mini floor boards, engine guards, handle bar grips I ended up with a personalized bike that worked and fit me ok,. About all I had left to do to increase it's long range comfort
was the Stiletto Shocks from Burlry, and either a Sargent ot Mustang seat some where around another $700 - 800 bucks
I was weary of throwing money and time to arrive at a almost bike.
I now have my Happy Place I went back to HD and traded for a used Dyna Supeglide custom that only asks me to add gas and oil and keep it clean. a little piece of me misses the lightness and flickability of the Rebel.
 

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While I was wrestling with ergonomic solutions for my bike, I considered the Honda forward rider seat. The list price for the smooth black seat is $65, and $100 for the quilted cover brown or black (from a Honda dealer). It could make using just the handlebars or 2" bar risers practical for you. Here is their description:

8R80-MLA-A00ZA Forward Rider Seat - Black

The Custom Forward Rider Seat moves the rider’s hip 25 mm forward. The forward seat is beneficial for smaller riders because it maintains the low seat height but improves reach to the handlebar controls. The exclusively tuned slim-shaped cushion ensures 60 mm plus-thickness for sufficient seating comfort. Seat surface dimension: 390 mm x 340 mm. N/A 08R72-MLA-J00ZB (Black) 08R72-MLA-J00ZA Brown Custom Forward Rider Seat The Custom Forward Rider Seat moves the rider’s hip 25 mm forward and features a diamond-stitch wadding with welded seams to eliminate water infiltration. The forward seat is beneficial for smaller riders because it maintains the low seat height but improves reach to the handlebar controls. The exclusively tuned slim-shaped cushion ensures 60 mm plus-thickness for sufficient seating comfort. Seat surface dimension: 390 mm x 340 mm
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
While I was wrestling with ergonomic solutions for my bike, I considered the Honda forward rider seat. The list price for the smooth black seat is $65, and $100 for the quilted cover brown or black (from a Honda dealer). It could make using just the handlebars or 2" bar risers practical for you. Here is their description:

8R80-MLA-A00ZA Forward Rider Seat - Black

The Custom Forward Rider Seat moves the rider’s hip 25 mm forward. The forward seat is beneficial for smaller riders because it maintains the low seat height but improves reach to the handlebar controls. The exclusively tuned slim-shaped cushion ensures 60 mm plus-thickness for sufficient seating comfort. Seat surface dimension: 390 mm x 340 mm. N/A 08R72-MLA-J00ZB (Black) 08R72-MLA-J00ZA Brown Custom Forward Rider Seat The Custom Forward Rider Seat moves the rider’s hip 25 mm forward and features a diamond-stitch wadding with welded seams to eliminate water infiltration. The forward seat is beneficial for smaller riders because it maintains the low seat height but improves reach to the handlebar controls. The exclusively tuned slim-shaped cushion ensures 60 mm plus-thickness for sufficient seating comfort. Seat surface dimension: 390 mm x 340 mm
I'll try moving forward then I have to lean back
 

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I now have my Happy Place I went back to HD and traded for a used Dyna Supeglide custom that only asks me to add gas and oil and keep it clean. a little piece of me misses the lightness and flickability of the Rebel.
I'm glad you found your Happy Place - that's a very important thing. For myself, my quest continues with the Rebel 1100. I've done most of the mods you mentioned, plus a Corbin dual seat, and it's got me to an Pretty Happy Place. The "lightness and flickability" part of the Rebel is what keeps me sticking with the Rebel. Touring comfort is important, but I also live in a part of Oregon that has wineries spread around twisty roads where you rarely see a car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I've tilted the bars down, that moved the grips back a little, (and got me some new toys :) jis screwdrivers!) did some:poop: changes to the backrest, and have a bit better arm -shoulder comfort.Got bars on the way, now if I get that fixed, I'll start on the tiny range, and stalling at low rpms
 

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I'm glad you found your Happy Place - that's a very important thing. For myself, my quest continues with the Rebel 1100. I've done most of the mods you mentioned, plus a Corbin dual seat, and it's got me to an Pretty Happy Place. The "lightness and flickability" part of the Rebel is what keeps me sticking with the Rebel. Touring comfort is important, but I also live in a part of Oregon that has wineries spread around twisty roads where you rarely see a car.
I wish you well, I was almost there on mine.
 
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