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Discussion Starter #1
So I have a Rebel 300 and just hit the 235 mile mark and when I down shift from 2nd to 1st it gets stuck in neutral and I am not half clicking. The second issue is when I do shift into 1st it will sometimes click into 1st and sometimes the shift arm will drop like there is still a gear left and I know I am in first. Shifting back up into 2nd and then back down into first seems to work but that is an issue that I don't want to become possibly life threating.
 

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I've read on this forum...........I'm not an expert......that as time goes on shifting gets much easier and settles down into place. Hopefully someone else with experience will chime in also.
 

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Snow,

Make sure you are leaving the clutch lever go the whole way out, as far away from the handle bars as it will go, between shifts.

After you make a shift make sure you completely remove your toes from the shift peg.

Ride a few more miles and you will be good to go.

Kenny G
 

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Kenny,

I am releasing the clutch lever all of the way though. Unless I am missing something, I am pretty sure I am doing everything right.
 

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Are you sure that the clutch is adjusted properly?
Might want to take it to the dealer again to have them check it out. Last thing you wanna do is riding around without being able to disengage the clutch properly!
 

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My 300 did the same thing after the first few hundred miles. It seemed to loosen after the cables stretched a bit and I had trouble shifting out of second. I checked the manual and there was too much slack (not disengaging all the way). Adjusted back to manual's spec (I think 10mm of freeplay) and it's been good ever since which has been like 400 more miles. Also the neutral-first issue where you say it almost clicks again to go into gear sounds normal to an extent. The times it doesn't want to shift into first, do you notice if you roll the bike an inch or two it clicks right in? Other bikes I've ridden have that too and seems to be normal, but it shouldn't be difficult or anything. That will get better too with a clutch lever adjustment.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I adjusted my clutch and it seems to be working fine now and it does slip into first when I push the bike foreward a bit. I was just worried because I have never experienced that before. Over all I love the bike and can't wait to slap the 500 motor into it.
 

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I wanted to add onto this issue. I'm happy you got it fixed Faalinsnow. Unfortunately mine is not. I am passed the breaking period and at 800 miles on the bike. When the bike was in for it's first service I even had them take a look at the issue. They said "they cant reproduce it" so there is no problem.

In addition, I did just find out while testing my breaking skills that when I stopped suddenly from 20 - 35 mph to a complete stop, my bike gets stuck in whatever gear it is in. Clutch is completely disengaged while I'm braking. I am forced to roll forward to backward with my free foot while holding the shift lever up or down to shift gears.

Has anyone seen this on their bike? Is this a common this with motorcycles and stopping rapidly?
 

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I............ when I stopped suddenly from 20 - 35 mph to a complete stop, my bike gets stuck in whatever gear it is in. Clutch is completely disengaged while I'm braking. I am forced to roll forward to backward with my free foot while holding the shift lever up or down to shift gears.

Has anyone seen this on their bike? Is this a common this with motorcycles and stopping rapidly?
Perfectly normal.

The gearbox is designed to shift gears while the engine is turning and this allows the finger to shift the cogs between ratios.

If you did a dead stop in 5th and the engine stopped, you would have to rock the bike in gear to allow the cogs to find engagement.

Same reason you have to "find neutral" when you've parked your bike in gear, sometimes it will just click in, most times you have to rock to move the cogs a bit.
 

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Perfectly normal.

The gearbox is best designed to shift gears while the engine is turning and this allows the forks to shift the cogs between ratios. The forks are moved by the shift drum.

If you did a dead stop in 5th and the engine stopped, you would have to rock the bike in gear to allow the dog clutches to find engagement.

Same reason you have to "find neutral" when you've parked your bike in gear, sometimes it will just click in, most times you have to rock to move the cogs a bit until the dogs align.
My terminology may be a bit dated so I revised some of the words after seeing an explanatory video.

Here it is, I think it's a great explanation for the beginner.


(MODS: If this contravenes posting links please delete).
 

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Try feathering the clutch a bit.

Let the clutch out just before you begin to feel the gear and engine engage, then shift down. It's an old trick and it works. Nothing is really wrong. You can let the dealer, or your shop, know that you have to do this from time to time. This trick is also good to help you find neutral, or to go from neutral to first.

When working on your emergency stops, try incorporating down shifts into the equation. Yes, that means there's a lot going on, but it will help you keep control of the bike and keep you in the right gear when you need to get out of trouble. It's also easier for the bike to make the gear change while the bike is in motion and the engine is working.
 

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My first motorcycle too. Well, I started on a scooter...so you get what I mean.

There is a great motorcycle skills android/iphone app from MCrider. A whole section for emergency stopping and techniques to apply while you're learning. I highly recommend it, in conjunction with a Motorcycle Safety Course...if you haven't done so already.

I was having issues going from neutral into first. I was also coming to a stop at traffic lights, or stop signs, without properly downshifting through the gears, then had the same issue as you. So I did some google rummaging and came upon the "feathering clutch" technique I describe above. Now, along with proper downshifting, I use the technique anytime I go from neutral into first...it's become a habit.

Then you'll get into rev-matching during downshifts, which for me was an epiphany, it makes shifting down through the gears so much smoother when you're at speed. It takes practice, but once you get it, man it really makes a difference and allows you to safely use the engine to help slow you down. It also eliminates back wheel chatter. Anyway, something to look into that I think might help you like it did me.
 

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........It also eliminates back wheel chatter. ...........
Do you mean the chugging effect as you slow down in too high a gear?

I only use the clutch to get into first and move of, all up changes after that are just a slight momentary "throttle off" change up.

Slowing down is always done with gears, hardly any brakes until I'm stopped. Changing down is something you plan as you ride. e.g.: you see a bend coming up so you change down a gear (or two) so that your bike is slowed and the engine is in the correct rev range to provide smooth power out of the bend.

Changing down gears is done with simultaneous "throttle blip / clutch feather / change down" and letting the engine do the braking.

There are occasions where you have to combine front/rear braking with engine braking as well, e.g.: in stop start city traffic, so practising both combinations will eventually become instinctive when riding.
 

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Do you mean the chugging effect as you slow down in too high a gear?

I only use the clutch to get into first and move of, all up changes after that are just a slight momentary "throttle off" change up.

Slowing down is always done with gears, hardly any brakes until I'm stopped. Changing down is something you plan as you ride. e.g.: you see a bend coming up so you change down a gear (or two) so that your bike is slowed and the engine is in the correct rev range to provide smooth power out of the bend.

Changing down gears is done with simultaneous "throttle blip / clutch feather / change down" and letting the engine do the braking.

There are occasions where you have to combine front/rear braking with engine braking as well, e.g.: in stop start city traffic, so practising both combinations will eventually become instinctive when riding.
Sorry not a great explanation on my part. I was referencing the rear wheel being forced to slow down until the gear is fully engaged and the engine speed has matched the new gear. Hastily dropping down in gears can cause the rear wheel to temporarily lose traction with the road...I describe it feeling like a chirp, or a momentary skip. Hence, when I learned to blip, or rev-match while downshifting, it was a big moment for me when I got the hang of it and now it's instinctual.
 

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I only use the clutch to get into first and move of, all up changes after that are just a slight momentary "throttle off" change up.
Little off topic here now, sorry, but you're telling us/me that you are short shifting with the Rebel?
I've not read myself up all too much on it, but I know the rough outline of it at least.
Enough to know that one shout not take short shifting lightly. And I honestly wasn't sure if one could do such with the Rebel even.
Far as I know it a "big deal" with racing bikes and such, and even have kits made specifically for that purpose.
Is there some 101 short shift tips for dummies? lol :laugh:
 

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Lyoko,

Before you try any fancy shifting without the clutch you should have to rebuild the transmission in a unit constructed engine....

There is a reason Honda puts a clutch in a bike and brakes at both ends of the bike.

I rest my case....

Kenny G
 

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Lyoko,

Before you try any fancy shifting without the clutch you should have to rebuild the transmission in a unit constructed engine....

There is a reason Honda puts a clutch in a bike and brakes at both ends of the bike.

I rest my case....

Kenny G
Yeah I'm quite torn on how I actually feel about quick shifting.. It's enticing to try it, as the thought of fast and easy gear shifting seems wonderful.
But the thought of screwing something up with the gearbox makes me shiver...
I understand the concept to as why and how quick shifts are able to happen, but to be able to do it without messing anything up is virtually zero.. There is just no freaking way you're gonna be able to get it a 100% right, in 100% of the cases.
Maybe when I have 25 years of experience behind me, lol, who knows..
Ain't gonna be making my Rebel my guinea pig for quick shifting at least.. Not yet? :p
 
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