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You guys that ride the highways are you just super bad ass and don't need a windshield or do you have full face helmets? Is there a windshield out there yet? I don't mind the wind in my face but on the highway I think it would make me a little crazy. I'm still a new rider (only 700 miles) but I freaking love it. Do I have to buck up or is there a secret I don't know about?

B
 

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I have the OEM windshield (meter visor) which helps a little, but I also never ride without a full face helmet.

I have no desire to catch a bug/rock in the face doing 60+ lol.

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I also don't like windshields they take away the looks, but as I have to drive on a freeway everyday for work, I bought this one

https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/...sal-windscreen

the pictures are in this thread.
http://www.hondarebel3forum.com/forum/665-accessories-add-ons/3809-new-windscreen-install-tomorrow.html#post44177


with a little tweak and adjustment of the angle, I find riding on freeway far more easier now. The bike is more stable and I don't get any wind on my chest and my shoulders are much more relaxed. I also have a full face helmet.
 

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i road on the highway for the first time yesterday. i don't have the windshield but i do wear a full face helmet. i did notice that around 70 the wind was blowing my head around like a bobble head doll. i figured out if i kinda tilt my head down that it cuts the wind better. probably also depends on what shape and style your helmet is.
 

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I haven't taken it out to the highway yet as I don't feel too comfortable taking it out there....

I do anywhere from 45-50 when allowed and to me the bike doesn't seem to be able to really handle anything above that...

Am I just crazy? I have the 500.
 

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Definitely crazy. :D

I have a 30 mile round trip and don't do any highway drive but all my street driving are suppose to be 45 - 55 MPH. Which in California means, 55 - 65 MPH. I've been caught in some pretty nasty 10 mph gusts and have never felt like my Rebel 300 couldn't handle going faster.... if it could :p.
 

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I haven't taken it out to the highway yet as I don't feel too comfortable taking it out there....

I do anywhere from 45-50 when allowed and to me the bike doesn't seem to be able to really handle anything above that...

Am I just crazy? I have the 500.
Sorry pal, it's you.. Love going 80 with mine :grin2:

Edit: With that being said, don't feel pressured to drive in a way that doesn't suit you. Drive within your limit. If you're full of fear behind the handlebar then things could turn really ugly in a short amount of time, so take your time instead :)
 

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I haven't taken it out to the highway yet as I don't feel too comfortable taking it out there....

I do anywhere from 45-50 when allowed and to me the bike doesn't seem to be able to really handle anything above that...

Am I just crazy? I have the 500.
I ride 36 miles to work round trip and about 20 of those miles are at highway speeds between 70-80(norther California and Bay Area) my 500 does just fine and I have not had any issues of "power". I just took my bike for a mountain ride yesterday, total round trip of 265 miles and even going uphill I had plenty of power.
 

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Hmmm....


This makes me want to try it but again, as someone said don't ride above my limit and I will definitely be taking it slow.


Thanks for all the encouragements!!
 

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So instead of a windscreen, let's work on you. It sounds like what you need more than anything, and that's cool. Based off of what Lyoko started, "don't feel pressured to drive in a way that doesn't suit you. Drive within your limit... take your time".

Yes! Take your time. There's no rush. No medals for highway riding. And the anxiety is MUCH better than overconfidence. Anxiety can be overcome with exposure, overconfidence can get you killed. Honestly, at first, I was pretty nervous on the highways too. Especially when the wind kicked up, which it usually does here in the afternoons. You will get used to it, I promise.

1. I tend to ride in the middle of the lane more in higher crosswinds. That gives me a few feet in either direction if a sudden gust moves me around. Obviously that should change depending on riding conditions, like rain, etc.
2. You can lessen the amount of wind force by changing your body position. Bring your elbows and knees in. Tuck your head down if you want. related to this is your clothes. Zip that jacket up before you ride. No need to ride with a sail attached to your chest. Keep that visor down on your helmet too. You're more streamlined, and you need to protect your eyes anyway. You can also play with tipping your helmet a little to change the way the wind affects your head.
3. Relax. I know, easier said than done. You have a few feet either way to move in your lane. A death grip on the bars is pretty much always a bad thing. If the wind pushes you over a bit, easy countersteering and lean will move you back. Trying to manhandle the bars will make it worse. Too many minutes of this kind of riding will wear you out too. Not good to ride exhausted.

Remember this!!!! At highway speeds, the gyroscopic force of your spinning wheels will keep you upright. Have you ever watched a video of a racer who falls off his bike and the bike keeps rolling along without him? Your bike wants to do that too. And the faster you go, the higher the force.
Last bit. My wife is still learning. When we ride together, and I feel like she's is tense on the bike, I tell her to flap her elbows like a chicken. Here's what I mean. With your hands still on the grips, move your elbows up and down a bit. This does a couple of things.
1. It forces you to relax your grip a bit because you can't grip tightly and move your arms around. It's like deep breathing in that it's a distraction.
2. It's actually practice in how small adjustments affect your bike and how the wind hits you.
3. It's kinda funny. You can't help but feel a little silly flapping your elbows.

You got this, YGodzilla.
 

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...don't feel pressured to drive in a way that doesn't suit you. Drive within your limit. If you're full of fear behind the handlebar then things could turn really ugly in a short amount of time, so take your time instead :)
I don't really enjoy riding busy highways - southern NH & MA, so I don't. Central NH to the White Mountains is OK. I've tried riding with different clubs / groups and don't like riding staggered formation, so I don't. When I used to have an hour commute (highway) by car, I'd always prefer a 1.5+ hr commute by bike.
 

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I don't really enjoy riding busy highways - southern NH & MA, so I don't. Central NH to the White Mountains is OK. I've tried riding with different clubs / groups and don't like riding staggered formation, so I don't. When I used to have an hour commute (highway) by car, I'd always prefer a 1.5+ hr commute by bike.
I've gotten used to the busy highways, but I didn't really have much of a choice if I wanted to save gas by riding to work (50 mile round trip). 65-70 mpg on the bike vs 20 mpg or so in my truck.

I live in Illinois and commute to Missouri; work right next door to the St. Louis airport, so it's all highways and interstates for me.

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I live in Illinois and commute to Missouri; work right next door to the St. Louis airport, so it's all highways and interstates for me.
Yikes, that's pretty much the worst commute in all of St. Louis. Be safe, brother.

I was just joking with a guy at Moto Europa that, near the city, you don't assume no one can see you. You assume that half don't see you and the other half don't give a F***.
 

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I've been riding since early June and am a newb this year. My Rebel 500A is my first bike, and i love everything about it. It took me about a month to get the confidence to ride on the highway/expressway where i live - Toronto, Canada - pretty much the busiest, fastest highways around (401, DVP). I took the bike on country roads first and got some practice going 80-100km/h. I had to get used to the wind and felt it was much more intimidating than i'd expected. I was actually pretty much terrified the first time i rode at speed past some farms with cross winds. The nerves settled after a bit of experience.

Now im riding pretty comfortably downtown - about 75km in variable traffic. The pace when its not 'busy' is about 120-130km/h and im happy to putter along at 100-110 in the slow lane. If i get caught up with trucks, i'll increase my speed to 120-125 and go in the fast lane to get around them. The first few times, the wind and trucks were terrifying. I wear a full face helmet, and i find i need to keep my head pretty straight. when i shoulder check at those speeds, i can really feel the push, but its not overwhelming. Just need to practice and get used to it. The wind is something i wasn't expecting, and after talking to people and reading posts, i realized its just a case of getting more accustomed to the sensations. Over time, i've become much more comfortable, but i still feel like im going into battle when i get on the highway.

Im very happy i got the bigger version of the bike - when i get caught near a bunch of trucks, i have total confidence the bike can accelerate easily from 100km/h to top speed (150+) without drama. Only thing i really hate on the highway is construction where they put grooves in the road :(

DJM:>
 

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Im riding a 500 as well.
Normally highway speeds don't bother me, Im wearing a Shoei GT Air, its designed for the riding position and I'm feeling very little drag & virtually no wind noise (bonus).
In saying that, had my first experience in some really windy weather yesterday. I was surprised at how much the bike moved around, especially cornering. I was leaning over and the cross wind was standing me back up. Counter steering is not something I was taught to do and I don't know where I picked it up (maybe riding dirt bikes when I was younger). It worked, and I have to say, our little bikes do it so well. It seems that every time I take my Rebel out Im discovering another reason to love it more.
I am curious though about the windscreens and how effective they are. I guess I want to know there a size/shape that is better.
 
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