Honda Rebel 300 & 500 Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everybody!

This is my first year getting into motorcycling and currently own a black Rebel 500 (non-ABS). So far I've put a little over 500 miles on the new Rebel and I'm loving it.

Originally I purchased a brand new 2017 Grom this past December, and once the snow melted here in WI I learned the basics on that. But once the new Rebels were released, I knew I had to upgrade. The Grom was extremely easy to learn on, but just didn't have enough power to make me happy. For one, being roughly 235 lbs, if I was riding into a headwind, I couldn't get above 45 MPH (on a 55 MPH road). That was a bummer.

Anyways, I think the Rebel 500 is a GREAT fit for a new rider like myself. I commute to/from work on the Rebel and love going out for rides whenever the weather allows.

I'm excited for the aftermarket parts to start rolling out so we can really start to customize our Rebels and make them our own.:smile2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Welcome to the forums and congratulations. The Grom does seem like an ideal learners bike as you can really throw it around and it's not over-powered by far.

What kind of mods are you looking towards for the Rebel 500? Also, why did you opt for the non-ABS version of it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
Welcome to the forums and congratulations. The Grom does seem like an ideal learners bike as you can really throw it around and it's not over-powered by far.

What kind of mods are you looking towards for the Rebel 500? Also, why did you opt for the non-ABS version of it?
My rebel 300 is non-abs. Quite honestly, never gave it much thought. Obviously abs is added security, but look at it this way, you master the non-abs, what need will you have for abs?


I had a few close calls already in the couple weeks I started riding, never locked up yet. Rear brake first, then front break, dam near stops on a dime, no skidding. I don't know, I guess is the comfort of rider or experience or something. I got next to no experience, but I feel quite comfortable and confident with my bike. Got a long way to go and learn, but it will come.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
814 Posts
My rebel 300 is non-abs. Quite honestly, never gave it much thought. Obviously abs is added security, but look at it this way, you master the non-abs, what need will you have for abs?


I had a few close calls already in the couple weeks I started riding, never locked up yet. Rear brake first, then front break, dam near stops on a dime, no skidding. I don't know, I guess is the comfort of rider or experience or something. I got next to no experience, but I feel quite comfortable and confident with my bike. Got a long way to go and learn, but it will come.
It does not matter how much you master a non ABS bike. You will never be able to stop as safely in an emergency as you can with ABS. And all the "expert riders" who say they can stop faster without ABS have been proven wrong over and over again in actual tests.

ABS does not make you a better rider, and it doesn't negatively affect expert riders. What it does is stop the wheels from locking up which can save you in a lot of situations.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,655 Posts
My rebel 300 is non-abs. Quite honestly, never gave it much thought. Obviously abs is added security, but look at it this way, you master the non-abs, what need will you have for abs?
I had a few close calls already in the couple weeks I started riding, never locked up yet. Rear brake first, then front break, dam near stops on a dime, no skidding. I don't know, I guess is the comfort of rider or experience or something. I got next to no experience, but I feel quite comfortable and confident with my bike. Got a long way to go and learn, but it will come.
Yeah, well... Have you tried the same on a wet road? Or on sand, gravel, leafs, etc?
And besides, rear brake first..? That not how you... I don't even.
That's one thing I've never understood over in the US, how the heck they actually allow you guys to drive with little to none learning/experience?!
Here in Norway, you take the bike license the same way with anything, car, truck/lorry, bus, etc. You go trou a whole prosess of theory and praktical driving, before having to take a test for both the theory and the driving. You pass that then you're good to go.
But this prosess takes time. Total time for it from start to finish is about 4/5 months.
In that time you first take a course with pure theory, before you're even allowed onto a bike.
Then you start your driving lessons, and you keep doing that until you progress enough to advance through the "levels" of driving. There is 4 levels.
City driving, traffic driving, highway driving, "back" ways of from main roads driving, special driving on a track to learn how to properly take corners (yes, just like the racing bikes/guys does it, not the same speeds thou) and last touring driving, driving total 3 hours on a mix of each and every scenario.
Depending on how well you manage to drive and do things correct will deside the total amount of time and the total cost in the end to take the license.
When you are through it all and your instructur and yourself agreed that you are ready to take the drivers test, then you're finished with the driving lessons.
If you fail on the driving test, you have to wait 2 weeks before you're able to try again. And if the driving was deemed too terrible then you're back to the driving lessons again to train more on the point that you failed on.
So yeah, the thought that you guys in the US can hop on a bike with just a two days learners ED is freaking terrifying for me.

I'm not trying to bash you or anyone else here with this, this is just in general speaking.
But I gotta say, your last words there is the most scary ones for me: "Got a long way to go and learn, but it will come."
And do you know why..?
Because if you are left alone with something, and are having to figure things out by yourself, from scratch, then I'd say there is at least a 70% chance that you will wound up with a bad driving habit, or several in worst case. And you probably already have some, at least one, since you mention that you use your rear brake first. That's a big no no. The front brake is your main, that's the one thats gonna save your life if you hope to stop in time if it ever comes to that. So the fact that you are deliberately using precious time to apply your rear breake first is a death wish.
There is alot more to a bike than just jumping on it and off you go. You gotta know what you are doing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,655 Posts
It does not matter how much you master a non ABS bike. You will never be able to stop as safely in an emergency as you can with ABS. And all the "expert riders" who say they can stop faster without ABS have been proven wrong over and over again in actual tests.

ABS does not make you a better rider, and it doesn't negatively affect expert riders. What it does is stop the wheels from locking up which can save you in a lot of situations.
Carefull what you're saying (writing) there now.
You make it sound like you can just "kill" the brake leaver with full force on it when wanting to stop as fast as possible, because the abs will activate and prevent the wheel from locking up.
It is partially true, but not all of it. If you believe that, then you are seriously mistaken.
Abs on bikes isn't there so that you can just brake as hard as you want and expect to stop the fastest/shortest possible.
It's there to prevent the wheel from locking, and that's it. So it will prevent you from wounding up with a bike on the side and you in the ditch. But the abs it self doesn't stop the bike faster.
So if you wound up in a situation where you have to emergency brake with your bike, and you feel the abs activating, then you've done something wrong actually. It's ok for it to kick in when you're at the last stage of breaking, when you're just about stopped, but nothing more than that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
814 Posts
Carefull what you're saying (writing) there now.
You make it sound like you can just "kill" the brake leaver with full force on it when wanting to stop as fast as possible, because the abs will activate and prevent the wheel from locking up.
It is partially true, but not all of it. If you believe that, then you are seriously mistaken.
Abs on bikes isn't there so that you can just brake as hard as you want and expect to stop the fastest/shortest possible.
It's there to prevent the wheel from locking, and that's it. So it will prevent you from wounding up with a bike on the side and you in the ditch. But the abs it self doesn't stop the bike faster.
So if you wound up in a situation where you have to emergency brake with your bike, and you feel the abs activating, then you've done something wrong actually. It's ok for it to kick in when you're at the last stage of breaking, when you're just about stopped, but nothing more than that.
Actually when tested in an emergency situation hitting both breaks causing ABS to kick would in fact be the fastest way to stop the bike.
Here is a video if you want to educate yourself a bit on emergency stopping with ABS.


I never said you should be activating ABS under normal riding conditions, nor did I say anything that should make someone think that.


Also no if you are in an emergency brake situation and you activate your ABS you have not done anything wrong. That is literally a good portion of the reason it is there. Yes obviously it is there to stop the wheels from locking, but the modulation is there to also help you stop faster in that emergency situation. You will not be stopping the bike fast enough otherwise in most emergency conditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
Yeah, well... Have you tried the same on a wet road? Or on sand, gravel, leafs, etc?
And besides, rear brake first..? That not how you... I don't even.
That's one thing I've never understood over in the US, how the heck they actually allow you guys to drive with little to none learning/experience?!
Here in Norway, you take the bike license the same way with anything, car, truck/lorry, bus, etc. You go trou a whole prosess of theory and praktical driving, before having to take a test for both the theory and the driving. You pass that then you're good to go.
But this prosess takes time. Total time for it from start to finish is about 4/5 months.
In that time you first take a course with pure theory, before you're even allowed onto a bike.
Then you start your driving lessons, and you keep doing that until you progress enough to advance through the "levels" of driving. There is 4 levels.
City driving, traffic driving, highway driving, "back" ways of from main roads driving, special driving on a track to learn how to properly take corners (yes, just like the racing bikes/guys does it, not the same speeds thou) and last touring driving, driving total 3 hours on a mix of each and every scenario.
Depending on how well you manage to drive and do things correct will deside the total amount of time and the total cost in the end to take the license.
When you are through it all and your instructur and yourself agreed that you are ready to take the drivers test, then you're finished with the driving lessons.
If you fail on the driving test, you have to wait 2 weeks before you're able to try again. And if the driving was deemed too terrible then you're back to the driving lessons again to train more on the point that you failed on.
So yeah, the thought that you guys in the US can hop on a bike with just a two days learners ED is freaking terrifying for me.

I'm not trying to bash you or anyone else here with this, this is just in general speaking.
But I gotta say, your last words there is the most scary ones for me: "Got a long way to go and learn, but it will come."
And do you know why..?
Because if you are left alone with something, and are having to figure things out by yourself, from scratch, then I'd say there is at least a 70% chance that you will wound up with a bad driving habit, or several in worst case. And you probably already have some, at least one, since you mention that you use your rear brake first. That's a big no no. The front brake is your main, that's the one thats gonna save your life if you hope to stop in time if it ever comes to that. So the fact that you are deliberately using precious time to apply your rear breake first is a death wish.
There is alot more to a bike than just jumping on it and off you go. You gotta know what you are doing.


Whoa man! lol. Didn't mean for my posting to come across in such a way. I do see where you are coming from though. And in no way do I think I or we can just jump and go and think we know everything about riding. However, that being said, that technique I used was in our drivers hand book. lol. So maybe its the level the system is on, not necessarily the rider? I don't know. I've spent countless hours reading and educating myself riding a motorcycle before I even bought it. Spent the first few days, at least 20hrs after I got the bike in a parking lot. Stop, go, park, on and off bike. Even made a bunch of emergency stops etc to try and get some sort of idea what to do/expect. No, I don't know everything, I know the basic fundamentals, and to give confidence to go to point a to b. I admit, I do not have the full confidence to handle big city traffic etc. Highway, at least for me, is relative easy, but, that being said, got to be prepared for cross winds, passing semi's etc. Learning this a km at a time. All I can do before I can take my course, which, is booked for next week. Couldn't get it any sooner.


And the course is actually pretty intense. You spend the whole time on the bike, 1st day is in a closed parking lot, 2nd day your on the road with the instructors. And the course teaches us that same techniques etc that the police learn on their course.


Yes, maybe that isn't enough for some people. For some people, they should be smart enough to take it in steps, to know their limits. remove the pressure to do more, go further, get overconfident in one shot. If that makes sense. lol.


Also, I am Canadian, not American, so please don't refer to anybody or everybody as American, or any other nationality in general, keep it peaceful cool?


Our Canadian cities are what, a quarter of the size as the cities in Europe? lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
527 Posts
As an American I find this thread...HIGHLY ENTERTAINING! lol
Not even mad, you've guys have pretty much hit the nail on the head.
Our safety course is basically a 4 hour classroom session, and 2 days in a parking lot (didn't even take us on ride on the road!), even the riding test is in a parking lot. Basically you can be licensed without ever touching the road.

Unfortunately we learn our "safety" riding skills from time spent riding, extra weekend courses, and/or word of mouth from more experienced riders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
712 Posts
As an American I find this thread...HIGHLY ENTERTAINING! lol
Not even mad, you've guys have pretty much hit the nail on the head.
Our safety course is basically a 4 hour classroom session, and 2 days in a parking lot (didn't even take us on ride on the road!), even the riding test is in a parking lot. Basically you can be licensed without ever touching the road.

Unfortunately we learn our "safety" riding skills from time spent riding, extra weekend courses, and/or word of mouth from more experienced riders.
Yep! My first time riding on an actual road was when I picked up my new 500 last month.

That said, there is a lot of good info taught in the MSF course, and it took me no time at all to be comfortable riding in traffic. I've actually been riding back and forth to work in St. Louis (50 mile round trip) on highways and interstates.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
As an American I find this thread...HIGHLY ENTERTAINING! lol
Not even mad, you've guys have pretty much hit the nail on the head.
Our safety course is basically a 4 hour classroom session, and 2 days in a parking lot (didn't even take us on ride on the road!), even the riding test is in a parking lot. Basically you can be licensed without ever touching the road.

Unfortunately we learn our "safety" riding skills from time spent riding, extra weekend courses, and/or word of mouth from more experienced riders.

Ya I thought about it after, this is kinda entertaining. lol.
And your right, and I don't even get classroom time. lol. 1 day parking lot, 1 day on the road. End of second day, road test. We actually do go on the road, but in all honesty it is a joke. lol. 15min road test, if u can change lanes, check blind spots, parallel park, show lane presence, you got your license. lol.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,655 Posts
Actually when tested in an emergency situation hitting both breaks causing ABS to kick would in fact be the fastest way to stop the bike.
Here is a video if you want to educate yourself a bit on emergency stopping with ABS.

Also no if you are in an emergency brake situation and you activate your ABS you have not done anything wrong. That is literally a good portion of the reason it is there. Yes obviously it is there to stop the wheels from locking, but the modulation is there to also help you stop faster in that emergency situation. You will not be stopping the bike fast enough otherwise in most emergency conditions.
If you call that video education, then I can understand the condition you're in with being allowed to drive with just about none experience/teaching.
The video doesn't even explain what I was trying to get at.
It did however point out strongly the fact witch I mentioned, that the abs prevents the wheels from locking up, and only that! Nothing else.
Yes, you can argue that abs gives you shorter stopping distance, but it's not the primary job for an abs system! Again, it's ONLY to prevent locking, nothing else!
Therefore you are NOT supposed to rely on the abs when performing an emergency stop. That is as a matter of fact.
Anyone without abs should be conserned with the danger of locking the wheels, so ofc a normal emergency stop will be longer without abs.
The abs gives you the safety of not locking the wheels, and therefore the rider can be more at ease about applying a larger force on the brake to stop quicker/shorter.

I never said you should be activating ABS under normal riding conditions, nor did I say anything that should make someone think that.
No you didn't directly say that, but you did say: "ABS does not make you a better rider, and it doesn't negatively affect expert riders."
That, together with the rest here, sounded for me like you were saying that activating the abs when breaking was a good thing, and you're still saying that...

But anyhuw, this can be debated to the end of time, and I don't have that kind of time.

Again thou, this ain't meant to bash someone, or to come here and "I know best, you know nothing" kinda thing, it's simply just a consern from my side. I just want people to ride safe and to know what they are doing on their bike. That's all.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,655 Posts
Ya I thought about it after, this is kinda entertaining. lol.
And your right, and I don't even get classroom time. lol. 1 day parking lot, 1 day on the road. End of second day, road test. We actually do go on the road, but in all honesty it is a joke. lol. 15min road test, if u can change lanes, check blind spots, parallel park, show lane presence, you got your license. lol.
This is fuel for nightmares for me... *shivers* lol:p
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,655 Posts
Whoa man! lol. Didn't mean for my posting to come across in such a way. I do see where you are coming from though. And in no way do I think I or we can just jump and go and think we know everything about riding. However, that being said, that technique I used was in our drivers hand book. lol. So maybe its the level the system is on, not necessarily the rider? I don't know. I've spent countless hours reading and educating myself riding a motorcycle before I even bought it. Spent the first few days, at least 20hrs after I got the bike in a parking lot. Stop, go, park, on and off bike. Even made a bunch of emergency stops etc to try and get some sort of idea what to do/expect. No, I don't know everything, I know the basic fundamentals, and to give confidence to go to point a to b. I admit, I do not have the full confidence to handle big city traffic etc. Highway, at least for me, is relative easy, but, that being said, got to be prepared for cross winds, passing semi's etc. Learning this a km at a time. All I can do before I can take my course, which, is booked for next week. Couldn't get it any sooner.
Heh, sorry about that..! Safety first..? :grin2:
Don't mean to take "you all" under the same comb here like that, but over here, on the other side of the pond, we kinda get the impression that "you guys over there" are allowed to drive just as soon as you can point at a bike and say "that's a bike".
And it connects somewhat to a little situation we have here as well, because we have these large scooters that have two small wheels at the front, and one at the rear, and those you are allowed to drive on your normal drivers licence for a car. So those people have NEVER had any teaching at all with how bikes works and all that.
And I find it seriously terrifying that such people are allowed to drive around on the road with the rest of us.
So yeah, just a little conserned on behalf of your, and everyone elses, safety.


Also, I am Canadian, not American, so please don't refer to anybody or everybody as American, or any other nationality in general, keep it peaceful cool?
Our Canadian cities are what, a quarter of the size as the cities in Europe? lol.
Well.. America, Canada, you're neighbors, so basically the same, no...? lol

Sorry about that, just had to, I get what you're saying, it's the same for Norway if someone thinks that Norway and Sweden is just basically the same.
We ain't...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
Its all good here. lol. ABS or NON-ABS, they both have there uses and faults. ABS, its reassurance that the wheels won't lock up under hard breaking, shorten stopping distance etc. NON-ABS, I can see people would shy away from it, but at the same time, you gotta know your bike too. You can do just as hard breaking in non-abs without locking the wheels, takes time, takes practice to figure out where the breaking threshold is.


But when it comes down to it, either or is as safe as the other. Your on a bike with no protection besides the clothes you wear, your instincts, and overall ability to keep control of the bike and yourself.


I know a lot of riders around where I live, one old fella told me a story years ago, got cut off, he knew he was done, and he had a split second to react. So he jumped! Flew over the vehicle, flew some feet or other, and soon as he hit ground he rolled to absorb the impact. Some might think the unconventional, but in fact he believed he probably saved his own life. He got some scrapes, smashed knee, and bruises, but walked away from it.


Would I of thought of that, don't know. Never heard of someone doing it on a bike, seen it done with someone crossing a street and a vehicle didn't see him and he jumped and bounced off the windshield, rolled over the roof, came down on the truck and landed on his feet, then ran after the vehicle as they kept going, lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Woundering the same. Not in stock? Impatient? :p
Both actually, haha!:grin2: One afternoon I decided to take a trip on the Grom up to my local Honda Power Sports dealer (I wanted to get a feel for the trip as I had scheduled my first service for the Grom there, and would need to take some 50+ MPH roads there, and wanted to ensure I could keep up on the lil' 125cc.

So I get up there and inquire about whether or not they would be able to order any Rebels (initially I wanted the ABS version). By pure coincidence they had just received one in stock (non-ABS) and were finishing assembly that day.

Apparently the store had actually requested 6 different Rebels from Honda, but due to demand, (and the apparent distributor rules that higher selling stores get higher priority with orders for new bikes), were only able to get their hands on one Rebel ALL RIDING SEASON! I guess this store has had the same struggle getting more Groms in stock as well (so they were happy to take my Grom on trade-in).

Living in a city of over 65,000 people, I was sort of surprised to find out it was that difficult for them to obtain stock for certain Honda models.

Anyways, I returned to the store the next day, and fortunately they had the black-colored Rebel (which was my first choice), but unfortunately no ABS. After I took a brief test ride, I knew it was the bike for me and decided to pull the trigger.

And to answer one of the other replies, yes the Grom was a GREAT learner bike, though I think the Rebel is ALSO a great learner bike (and I'm definitely still learning). The extra power the Rebel offers (over the Grom) was just what I wanted. I can now keep up with (or get away from) traffic whether in town, on the highway, or on back country roads. Yay! :)
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top