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Anyone experiencing this? After about 30-45 minutes into riding my ride hand starts going numb. Especially my thumb. I'm on a 500, so I thought there'd be less vibrations. Anyone else have this issue or a solution?
 

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Anyone experiencing this? After about 30-45 minutes into riding my ride hand starts going numb. Especially my thumb. I'm on a 500, so I thought there'd be less vibrations. Anyone else have this issue or a solution?
I was experiencing it till very lately, but no more!

A few things that may help -
Get foam grips on top of the Honda grips - it will make grips wider, less cramping, and will also block vibrations.
Another one is getting a Go Cruise or throttle boss so you won't have to hold on to the throttle so tightly on longer rides.

Lastly - I went to a riding ergonomics workshop the other week and it completely changed the way I ride, removing all pressure from my fingers. The trick is to anchor your body to the motorcycle by holding on to the gas tank with your knees, hunching your body a bit and crunching your abs. you'll immediately see that you can release the death grip on the handlebars and your ride becomes more accurate, with less pressure on your hands.

Hope this helps!
 

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A few things that can help.

1. Aftermarket grips (replacement grips or slip-ons that go over the stock grips). I installed Kuryakyn Kinetic grips within days of buying the bike... stock grips were horrible.

2. Good gloves with vibration dampening foam/gel. I wear Revit Canyon 2 leather gloves.

3. Bar/grip end weights. I just installed the Kuryakyn grip end weights on mine last night, as I'm still getting a bit of tingling (mostly middle two fingers) in my throttle hand commuting to work and back (~30 to 45 minutes each way, depending on traffic).

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N920A using Tapatalk
 

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I went to a riding ergonomics workshop the other week and it completely changed the way I ride, removing all pressure from my fingers. The trick is to anchor your body to the motorcycle by holding on to the gas tank with your knees, hunching your body a bit and crunching your abs. you'll immediately see that you can release the death grip on the handlebars and your ride becomes more accurate, with less pressure on your hands.
*Sigh* This right here is just about the very first thing we learn here in Norway when starting to take the riding courses to get your license for mc. Here it's basic knowledge, and you HAVE TO ride like that in order to make a shortest possible stop as possible. It helps preventing you from overloading the front suspension when dealing with an emergency breaking, and thus prevents you from throwing the brakes into unnessesary abs function, as that will cause a longer stopping distance.

I've said it before, and I'll say it again: The fact that you are allowed out on the road with just a two days course on a parkinglot is freaking scary as ****!
I seriously wounder how many deaths you guys have each year just from bikers riding around and ending up killing themself because they don't really know how to drive a bike.
 

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A good set of gloves will help as everyone has stated.
Yeah, I have the stock grips on my bike still, and I'm only using thin summer gloves, and I've never had a problem with any vibration.

But for those who complain about excessive vibrations on the handlebar, check the bolts and nuts that holds the handlebar. Just a thought.
 

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*Sigh* This right here is just about the very first thing we learn here in Norway when starting to take the riding courses to get your license for mc. Here it's basic knowledge, and you HAVE TO ride like that in order to make a shortest possible stop as possible. It helps preventing you from overloading the front suspension when dealing with an emergency breaking, and thus prevents you from throwing the brakes into unnessesary abs function, as that will cause a longer stopping distance.

I've said it before, and I'll say it again: The fact that you are allowed out on the road with just a two days course on a parkinglot is freaking scary as ****!
I seriously wounder how many deaths you guys have each year just from bikers riding around and ending up killing themself because they don't really know how to drive a bike.
I know, crazy scary!

BTW, I'm visiting Oslo at the beginning of August - any cool recommendations I should check out?
 

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BTW, I'm visiting Oslo at the beginning of August - any cool recommendations I should check out?
Huh, neat, that's cool ^^, And you're American, or..? Business or pleasure trip?

But yeah, um, recommentaions... If you happen to be one of those kinda guys that finds it fun and interesting with museums, history, sights and such, then you'll have a blast! Enough of that to go around!
If you however are on the opposite scale, then I have some bad news for you...
I've never understood people coming to Norway on their vacation trip, because there is literally nothing to do here... Besides the bloody museums, so many museums, they are everywhere.... *shivers*
However, if an amusement park is of interest, then Norways biggest (and in reality Norways only) is located only 20 min away from Oslo by car. Or about 30 min by public transport.
The park is called Tusenfryd. It has alot to offer, and there is something for everyone there, regardless of what you might enjoy, be it adrenalin, speed, calm, etc.
But the main thing about Norway, that some apparently finds interesting? is our nature and the sights around the country. Yes by all means, we have some stunning view here and there, but they are through out the whole country, and often more than not at remote places that you have to hike at least 2-3 hours just to get to them. But hey, I guess someone finds that fun too. I for one would not spend my vacation on it thou, but I may just be spoiled by living here and all, I dunno..
So yeah, anyhow, I would suggest checking out Tripadvisor in regards of things to do in Oslo, you might find something interesting there that could catch your drift.
 

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*Sigh*

I've said it before, and I'll say it again: The fact that you are allowed out on the road with just a two days course on a parkinglot is freaking scary as ****!
I seriously wounder how many deaths you guys have each year just from bikers riding around and ending up killing themself because they don't really know how to drive a bike.
Actually you don't need to keep saying it, we get it. The only way to be a responsible, educated, safe motorcycle rider is to have earned a Norwegian MC license. And just so your clear, you don't even need 2 days driving around a parking lot if you're over 21. Just a take the 10 minute test.

Land of the free!!
 

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Actually you don't need to keep saying it, we get it. The only way to be a responsible, educated, safe motorcycle rider is to have earned a Norwegian MC license. And just so your clear, you don't even need 2 days driving around a parking lot if you're over 21. Just a take the 10 minute test.

Land of the free!!
No I suppouse I don't need to, but I'm probably gonna keep saying it anyway. It's one of those things that can't be said often enough, you know?
And no, it doesn't have to be an Norwegian one, by all means, you'll get good education and instruction in just about any country here in Europe :)
Yeah I've heard about that, only recently thou. Even more frightening than before...
Here we have 3 different classes of engine size on the bikes, so at a young age you're only allowed to drive the first one, called A1, with max ccm to 125. You can take that at the age of 16.
At the age of 18 you can upgrade to class A2, wich allowes you to drive bikes with a max of 650 ccm.
And if you got A2 at the age of 18, and keept driving until you were 20, you could then upgrade again to full mc license class A, wich allowes you to drive everything out there with two wheels no matter the size.
However, if you don't have class A2 from before, then you werent allowed to get class A until you were 22 of age, but they changed that a few years ago to 24 instead, due to the danger with large ccm mc's.
So yeah, safety first!
 

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fyi. Most accidents on bikes are caused by other drivers not seeing a biker. And some people will actually try to run a bigger off the road. Either for noise, or whatever else. Not much a biker can do besides try to avoid an accident, but accidents happen.


Just saying. lol. Some ppl shouldn't even be allowed to drive a car. But is what it is. Our country also don't have the amount of people that you do, or the speed limits etc. All makes a difference in some way or other. But not as many deaths as in Europe that's for sure.
 

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fyi. Most accidents on bikes are caused by other drivers not seeing a biker. And some people will actually try to run a bigger off the road. Either for noise, or whatever else. Not much a biker can do besides try to avoid an accident, but accidents happen.


Just saying. lol. Some ppl shouldn't even be allowed to drive a car. But is what it is. Our country also don't have the amount of people that you do, or the speed limits etc. All makes a difference in some way or other. But not as many deaths as in Europe that's for sure.
Ofc, that's very true. Didn't say the leading cause of accident and/or death related to mc drivers is inexperience, but yeah, anyway.
We will all experience it sooner or later, "I didn't see you", "You were speeding", "You were in my blindspot" etc, etc, etc...
People are always good at finding excuses and reasons to blame bikers for just about everything and anything...
Because ofc, it's our fault that they don't look in their blindspot when they suddenly miss their exit and pull out infront of us without indicating even, where you just happened to be at that moment because you were "speeding" when you in fact was following the moving traffic...
 

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I'm born and raised in the USA and have ridden on country backroads, expressway, highway, suburbs, and in the city. Comfortable, no problem.
Last year my wife and I vacationed throughout Europe and there is no chance in h*** I'd want to ride there! completely different than here.

more people per sq/ft, lanes are a lot narrower, and some people are just more ballsy w/ their driving. I completely understand why the requirements to ride are more stringent there than here. I have no problem admitting European riders are generally more skilled and trained than us.
 

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In the U.S. all that you need is 2 wheels and a Smart Phone to be an expert motorcycle rider.

Try riding in London where the streets are usually wet.

Kenny G
 

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The school here in AZ- Team Arizona just sent out an article that the Fed's are trying to run legislation of it being a two week course and asked for comments. Most, myself included think it's a good idea, but don't like the Fed part. Some concerns, though, if it'll turn people away from riding. I'm taking my time and building confidence. My goal this week is to hit the roundabout that let's you leave town and head up on highway 69.
 

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fyi. Most accidents on bikes are caused by other drivers not seeing a biker. And some people will actually try to run a bigger off the road. Either for noise, or whatever else. Not much a biker can do besides try to avoid an accident, but accidents happen.
Actually, that's wrong. According to the latest study, the leading cause of accidents is... us. Most were riders running into the back of cars.

Also, the study found that aggressive riding increased risk by a factor of 18 while inattention or lack of skill increased it by a factor of nine. Combine the two, and odds of an incident increased by 30.

Land of the free=land of the idiots. There's no room to blame others if we're dead. If I get into an accident or even a near miss, it's MY job to analyze what I could have done differently. Yes, there are idiots on their cell phones, but it's my job to avoid them. Yes there are people who don't see me while making a left turn, but it's my job to slow down at intersections and be ready for the worst.

If you are a new rider, I can't stress this enough. It's your * job to keep yourself alive.

Link to the study by Virginia Tech
 

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Brought back an old thread.
When I was using the stock grips in my 300, I didn't feel the numbness until after around 30 minutes. After I changed the grip to a bit thicker rubber grips my left hand starts to numb in less than 15min.

Any suggestions about grips? I'm thinking of getting something smooth like the stock one.
 
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