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Discussion Starter #1
I've been looking at engine guards lately.

Is it really useful?

Does it ruin the look of the bike or it actually does make the bike look cool?

Do I need it?

Need some suggestions and tips

Thanks and cheers!
 

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I've been looking at engine guards lately.

Is it really useful?

Does it ruin the look of the bike or it actually does make the bike look cool?

Do I need it?

Need some suggestions and tips

Thanks and cheers!
Answered in order:
  1. It can be yes, especially if you lay down your bike.
  2. Thats a personal choice, personally I think they look horrible, but thats my opinion.
  3. Thats up to you and your level of comfort and riding experience. It can't really hurt anything.
 

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my personal opinions: its only useful if you lay down the bike, can save on higher priced damage.
I think it changes the look of the bike (not in a good way to me)
No you don't need it. it's more of your choice, and/or piece of mind
 

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I'm loving them. Took me a minute to accept them, but they're here to stay. I throw my legs up on there for stretching out, which made this little bike a LOT more comfortable! I like the way they look too. Well worth it, because my rear is so busy and big, with luggage, needed something to add more mass to the front. Still need more, so maybe some windshield or something, maybe taller bars... Shipped arrived in 3 days from Thailand.
 

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my personal opinions: its only useful if you lay down the bike, can save on higher priced damage.
I think it changes the look of the bike (not in a good way to me)
No you don't need it. it's more of your choice, and/or piece of mind
I agree. That radiator is pretty vulnerable sticking out the sides like that. I don't plan on dropping, but when I do, I just saved myself a lot of trouble by not leaking all my water-cooling-coolant out. These H2C crashbars protect the living mist out of that vulnerable radiator. It was worth it for the peace of mind for me, and the highway legrest is an added bonus.
 

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I call them 'Crush Bars' - will not help in a crash, might pin your leg to the bike when they collapse from impact - so not good for crash, but good for mounting highway pegs or fog lights. Also good if your bike falls over.
 

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I call them 'Crush Bars' - will not help in a crash, might pin your leg to the bike when they collapse from impact - so not good for crash.
The bike would crush your leg if you DIDN'T have them there! I call them, "ANTI-CRUSH-BARS".

I'd reckon it's a lot more likely to get a leg stuck under a bike laying flat on its side, than one-inch of round-bar holding the entire bike up 8-inches crushing your leg. I can't imagine any situation where one's leg would be that far forward.

Have you ever heard of any injuries that were worsened because of crash-bars? Any evidence? Thanks.
 

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The bike would crush your leg if you DIDN'T have them there! I call them, "ANTI-CRUSH-BARS".

I'd reckon it's a lot more likely to get a leg stuck under a bike laying flat on its side, than one-inch of round-bar holding the entire bike up 8-inches crushing your leg. I can't imagine any situation where one's leg would be that far forward.

Have you ever heard of any injuries that were worsened because of crash-bars? Any evidence? Thanks.
Thin tube sticking out the side of the bike will be the first thing to collapse. I don't believe I could predict any particular thing that could or could not happen during a crash - can you?
 

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Crash bars are dangerous ? Duane Ausherman BMW motorcycles

https://www.hg.org/article.asp?id=31124

https://www.quora.com/Do-crash-bars-on-motorcycles-really-protect-the-rider-If-so-which-types-are-the-best

https://www.yourerielawyers.com/Library/Motorcycle-Accidents-Library/USC_Motorcycle_Study.pdf

"Hurt Report"

"Crash bars have the prospect of protecting the lower limbs in the event of
collision with another vehicle, or during a fall to the roadway. The regions of
the body most likely to be involved are the somatic regions of the thigh (T),
knee (K), lower leg (L), and ankle-foot (9). In the 900 accident cases, there
were 1321 discrete injuries to these "protectable" regions. Table 6.12.3 shows the
distribution of these individual injuries to the protectable regions, for the 900
motorcycles with and without crash bars. The motorcycles equipped with crash bars
(16.1%) accounted for a" equivalent share (17.9%) of the injuries to those regions
of the body that are assumed to be protectable by crash bars. Consequently, no
advantage is obvious from the use of crash bars."

https://www.msgroup.org/Tip.aspx?Num=023

etc.
 

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Crash bars are dangerous ? Duane Ausherman BMW motorcycles

https://www.hg.org/article.asp?id=31124

https://www.quora.com/Do-crash-bars-on-motorcycles-really-protect-the-rider-If-so-which-types-are-the-best

https://www.yourerielawyers.com/Library/Motorcycle-Accidents-Library/USC_Motorcycle_Study.pdf

"Hurt Report"

"Crash bars have the prospect of protecting the lower limbs in the event of
collision with another vehicle, or during a fall to the roadway. The regions of
the body most likely to be involved are the somatic regions of the thigh (T),
knee (K), lower leg (L), and ankle-foot (9). In the 900 accident cases, there
were 1321 discrete injuries to these "protectable" regions. Table 6.12.3 shows the
distribution of these individual injuries to the protectable regions, for the 900
motorcycles with and without crash bars. The motorcycles equipped with crash bars
(16.1%) accounted for a" equivalent share (17.9%) of the injuries to those regions
of the body that are assumed to be protectable by crash bars. Consequently, no
advantage is obvious from the use of crash bars."

https://www.msgroup.org/Tip.aspx?Num=023

etc.
Interesting! I don't think these H2C would collapse though. They are STOUT! Just mild steel, sure, but thick walled tubing, shaped in a way to spread impact forces and if your accident was enough to collapse these bars, you'd surely be dead too.

I'll continue having them on ALL my bikes - it's a requirement for me, though I rarely drop 'em... I actually like the way the look (usually) and love the footrest options.

Bikes are just "dangerous". Hard bags can really mess you up too, but I like to pretend that my body will fit in that space between the hard bags and crashbars in a tipover, not crushing me... if I'm careful about where I keep my leg during the (in slow motion) crash.

Not picking up your feet fast enough and hitting a lip in the concrete could crush your leg between it and your hardbags, for instance. It's all "dangerous" in some way or another. Just got to know the risks and prepare to reduce them, I guess. Be careful out there, folks, and crash safely! >:)
 

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my serious question about using the crash bars as a foot rest..
are you at all concerned that while cruising on the highway in a sudden emergency situation (ie -deer jumps in the road or something similar), you might lose valuable seconds to move your feet back to the controls to help decelerate or downshift -since you're feet aren't ready at the gearshift or rear brake?
 

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also i think we all have the "slow motion" ideas in the event of a crash :) like if i'm going down on this side can i pull my leg out fast enough before its trapped underneath, etc.
luckily i've never had that issue and hope it continues that way! For all of us really!
 

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my serious question about using the crash bars as a foot rest..
are you at all concerned that while cruising on the highway in a sudden emergency situation (ie -deer jumps in the road or something similar), you might lose valuable seconds to move your feet back to the controls to help decelerate or downshift -since you're feet aren't ready at the gearshift or rear brake?
Not in the slightest. Think about an emergency stop. Your feet have the least forces available to slow you down. You're not going to be downshifting with your left foot if you're trying to stop as fast as you can.

Also, it's milliseconds to move your feet, and I've been doing it for many years, instead of getting forward controls. I prefer it this way (separate forward foot rests). Also, I tend to put my feet back to the controls when I sense any hairy situations, or when in heavy traffic, etc. If it freaks you out, by all means, forget about it.
 

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lesser yes but still 30% back there compared to the 70% in front. i'd think you'd want all available stopping power in that event. but if it's fraction of a second for you guess you're all set.
i was just curious if that was a consideration at all-since i've never used any additional forward foot rest/pegs and have no desire to.
 

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lesser yes but still 30% back there compared to the 70% in front. i'd think you'd want all available stopping power in that event. but if it's fraction of a second for you guess you're all set.
i was just curious if that was a consideration at all-since i've never used any additional forward foot rest/pegs and have no desire to.
You put your feet back to the controls preemptively. You just stretch out on the open road, when no one's around you. It's just an extra option, you don't have to use 'em. It's nice, after miles and miles, to be able to straighten out my legs. I can stretch my hamstrings without stopping or getting off the bike. Just when I'm chillin' safe and just cruisin' it's nice to have the option to stretch. Don't have your feet up there in stop and go traffic. It's just another option for comfort.
 

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On the open road, being able to put your legs straight out and stretch, is like kickin' back in your favorite recliner, after a very laborious day at t'werk. Without any option for this, I feel like my hips and knees kinda start to cramp up and I would stand straight up on my old bike that didn't have an option to stretch. This was an Adventure bike. Standing up is cold when it's cold outside, and gets crazy on the highway... I'd rather just kick my legs up.

These H2C bars on my Rebel only work for this because my boots come up just high enough to cushion my CALVES from the bars. If I had regular 8 eyelet boots on, it might not be so comfortable. For reference, on my Indian, when I put my legs up on its crashbars, I can just BARELY get my SOLES of my boots to hang on to 'em, so the Rebel, from seat to "hwy footrests on H2C crashbars" is like a foot and a half shorter.
 

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Also, it's milliseconds to move your feet, and I've been doing it for many years, instead of getting forward controls.
Sorry man, but I think you overestimate you and your bodies ability to react.

The fact is it usually takes a person 1-2 seconds to recognize a dangerous situation and then another 1-3 seconds to react. Even if you were to cut those facts in half it is still nowhere close to 'milliseconds'.

Best case scenario in an emergency that you saw coming you would still take the better part of 1-2 seconds to move your leg off the bar and put them on the rear brake and only then would you start to actually apply the brake given another 1-2 seconds. Lets not forget that no rider is going to apply full front brake and zero rear brake because... well because that is very stupid and can easily lead to sending you over the bars and your bike following suit. So while 70% of the brake force comes from the front brake you need to use both brakes to stop safely and quickly.

That also assumes you see the danger coming, which lets be honest if every rider/driver saw something coming the worldwide crash statistics would be drastically lower.

I'm not trying to come down on you, but in all honesty your body simply cannot react to ANYTHING in milliseconds. Being realistic with yourself, your body, and your driving ability is a crucial part of any skill.

And as for the bars themselves they are not structural, they are not for ANY protection outside of the bike falling over or a very low speed lay down. Cheap mild steel (which all these items are, don't kid yourself) quickly and easily crushes, bends, and deforms under very little pressure. I promise you that you can stand in front of your bike and full force kick the outermost portion and bend the steel, and that force is VERY small in comparison to the force and physics when involved in any high speed lay down (speed of like 50 mph x 400+ lbs of mass = those bars will bend, brake, crush etc) or in the event of being struck by another vehicle or stationary object.

I know this post has been mostly negative, and I'm sorry. But you need to have honest and realistic expectations of you, your skill level, your bike, and your mods. Overestimating ANY of these individually or together could potentially put you in a dangerous and possibly life threatening situation.
 

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Sorry man, but I think you overestimate you and your bodies ability to react.

The fact is it usually takes a person 1-2 seconds to recognize a dangerous situation and then another 1-3 seconds to react. Even if you were to cut those facts in half it is still nowhere close to 'milliseconds'.

Best case scenario in an emergency that you saw coming you would still take the better part of 1-2 seconds to move your leg off the bar and put them on the rear brake and only then would you start to actually apply the brake given another 1-2 seconds. Lets not forget that no rider is going to apply full front brake and zero rear brake because... well because that is very stupid and can easily lead to sending you over the bars and your bike following suit. So while 70% of the brake force comes from the front brake you need to use both brakes to stop safely and quickly.

That also assumes you see the danger coming, which lets be honest if every rider/driver saw something coming the worldwide crash statistics would be drastically lower.

I'm not trying to come down on you, but in all honesty your body simply cannot react to ANYTHING in milliseconds. Being realistic with yourself, your body, and your driving ability is a crucial part of any skill.

And as for the bars themselves they are not structural, they are not for ANY protection outside of the bike falling over or a very low speed lay down. Cheap mild steel (which all these items are, don't kid yourself) quickly and easily crushes, bends, and deforms under very little pressure. I promise you that you can stand in front of your bike and full force kick the outermost portion and bend the steel, and that force is VERY small in comparison to the force and physics when involved in any high speed lay down (speed of like 50 mph x 400+ lbs of mass = those bars will bend, brake, crush etc) or in the event of being struck by another vehicle or stationary object.

I know this post has been mostly negative, and I'm sorry. But you need to have honest and realistic expectations of you, your skill level, your bike, and your mods. Overestimating ANY of these individually or together could potentially put you in a dangerous and possibly life threatening situation.
You sure do know it all, for having literally just gotten your license yesterday. Or was it the day before? Congrats on passing your class. :rolleyes:

Sunday (Test day)
(from) http://www.hondarebel3forum.com/forum/113-honda-rebel-300-500-general-discussion/9314-its-almost-time-ride.html
 

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I think it's neat that we're splitting hairs to this degree.

Yes, you can get hurt by crash bars in a crash and that's going to be situational-not 100% of the time. You're probably going to get hurt by a lot of other things as well in that instance, but having less things to hurt you is always better. Not surprisingly though, no one is complaining about the infinite other things that can be added to a bike that can also hurt you in some way. I wonder how many people eat their aftermarket windscreen in an accident?

But what crash bars really do is protect parts of your bike when you drop it or knock it over accidentally. They save your tank/engine/fairings in the event that you don't put your kickstand fully down or grab a handful of front brake in the parking lot at 5 mph or you stop your bike fully when taking it down a ramp off of a truck and can't actually touch the ground yet... The main point is that you have to get past the 'crash' in the name 'crash bars' because they didn't want to call them 'accidental drop bars'.
 
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