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So I'll be needing my first oil change soon, and the manual says to replace the drain plug seal washer, but doesn't give a part number or size needed (unless I'm overlooking that somewhere).

I found K&N filters (thanks to another post here), but am lost on the washers.
 

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So I'll be needing my first oil change soon, and the manual says to replace the drain plug seal washer, but doesn't give a part number or size needed (unless I'm overlooking that somewhere).

I found K&N filters (thanks to another post here), but am lost on the washers.

Not sure on the washers. can't find the bag with the part number, but I know they are 0.65 each at honda
 

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Reusing washers is not unheard of, I do it myself. Just check for drippage before and after your first use following the oil change.
 

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I changed my oil last night... only to discover the shop didn't even bother to put on a drain plug washer when they changed the oil a few months ago. I didn't have any issues with leaking or seepage the last time around, so I put it back on sans-washer. Am I going to regret this down the road? :grin2:
 

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I changed my oil last night... only to discover the shop didn't even bother to put on a drain plug washer when they changed the oil a few months ago. I didn't have any issues with leaking or seepage the last time around, so I put it back on sans-washer. Am I going to regret this down the road? :grin2:
Canuck,

You are not going to regret not having the sealing washer if it doesn't leak.

If it leaks you have to drain the oil and start over.

Any motorcycle shop will have the crush washers, I think they only come in 2 sizes, and if you tell the parts clerk that it is a Honda with the CB engine he will fix you up.

Kenny G
 

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Canuck,

You are not going to regret not having the sealing washer if it doesn't leak.

If it leaks you have to drain the oil and start over.

Any motorcycle shop will have the crush washers, I think they only come in 2 sizes, and if you tell the parts clerk that it is a Honda with the CB engine he will fix you up.

Kenny G
I sent the dealer an email wondering why it was omitted after I had it in the shop -- looks like they just forgot. She couldn't really give me a straight up answer as they have literally hundreds of them on the parts shelf.

Anyhoo, they're mailing me a freebie for the next time I change it up. I think the stamp costs more than the crush washer!
 

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I sent the dealer an email wondering why it was omitted after I had it in the shop -- looks like they just forgot. She couldn't really give me a straight up answer as they have literally hundreds of them on the parts shelf.

Anyhoo, they're mailing me a freebie for the next time I change it up. I think the stamp costs more than the crush washer!
Canuck,

Keep an eye on the drain plug, but if it is not leaking now chances are you will be OK.

I usually park my bikes in the garage with a piece of newspaper underneath so I can see any kind of leak easily.

Kenny G
 

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no washer, not a good idea

I changed my oil last night... only to discover the shop didn't even bother to put on a drain plug washer when they changed the oil a few months ago. I didn't have any issues with leaking or seepage the last time around, so I put it back on sans-washer. Am I going to regret this down the road? :grin2:
Even on Honda cars, the dealer ALWAYS uses a new oil drain plug washer. The reason is because the new washer is a "crush" washer, and when you tighten the drain plug, the washer "gives" a bit as the drain plug is tightened, thus creating a torque seal preventing the drain plug from backing out. Without the washer (or using an old previously crushed washer) will not afford you the torque crushing for one thing and secondly, you'll have to tighten the plug a little more to get to the point where the plug won't back out. Here's the bad part (in theory); because there is no new washer to "crush" and take up the load, the load is transferred instead to the threads on the crankcase. As with the cars, I've seen many stripped oil pan threads from people using the old washers. Save yourself the possible headache of stripped crankcase threads and buy a bunch of the aluminum washers to replace every time you do an oil change. I have literally dozens of them for my family's "fleet" of 4 Honda Fits and I have NEVER had a problem of stripped threads, even with over 100,000 miles on one of them. The Honda dealer wouldn't require a new drain plug washer on every oil change if there wasn't a good reason (I seriously doubt that they're so "hard up" on making money that the "expensive" 40 cent washer would make or break their profit margin.)
 
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