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Rather a graphic demonstration, but it's one of the most important things new riders must understand and get used to.

I've ridden for 50+ years and have always used counter steering ever since I experienced it as a young kid riding bikes in paddocks and back lanes.

I've done it for so long that it's instinctive. By the way, I'm totally self taught and have never done a rider training course in my life.
When I started riding there was no such thing, and by the time there were rider training courses, I was totally at one with my bikes.

I don't actually try to "steer" the bike when riding at speed. If I need to go right, I gently push on the right grip and the bike leans and turns right.

I use my "push right to go right/push left to go left" method as it makes sense to me rather than "steer left to go right".

Similarly, if I want to go left, gently push on the left grip and the bike leans to the left and turns left.

As I said, it becomes instinctive, but if you're a new rider it must be conditioned into your mind and body and I think the only way to do that is to find a suitable area and experiment and get the feel of how you and the bike interact.

Cheers
Jim
 

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The last thing this form needs is for people to post crash videos. If anyone wants to see crash videos they can go to YouTube. It has no place here. These videos have no value at all.
 

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Rather a graphic demonstration, but it's one of the most important things new riders must understand and get used to.

I've ridden for 50+ years and have always used counter steering ever since I experienced it as a young kid riding bikes in paddocks and back lanes.

I've done it for so long that it's instinctive. By the way, I'm totally self taught and have never done a rider training course in my life.
When I started riding there was no such thing, and by the time there were rider training courses, I was totally at one with my bikes.

I don't actually try to "steer" the bike when riding at speed. If I need to go right, I gently push on the right grip and the bike leans and turns right.

I use my "push right to go right/push left to go left" method as it makes sense to me rather than "steer left to go right".

Similarly, if I want to go left, gently push on the left grip and the bike leans to the left and turns left.

As I said, it becomes instinctive, but if you're a new rider it must be conditioned into your mind and body and I think the only way to do that is to find a suitable area and experiment and get the feel of how you and the bike interact.

Cheers
Jim
I’m all for posting training videos but posting a crash video has no training value. The same point can be made without showing someone being run down by a big rig.
 

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I totally see where you're coming from Longbeachgary, it was a big pill to swallow when I first watched it.

my only gripe with the video is not the content, or the bluntness, or even it being posted on this forum. My problem is the exact sentence that says "If the rider counter steered they would not have collided with the truck."

I hate statements like that because it's so easy for anyone to be an expert in retrospect of an event. I could have been president too if only I had done that one thing years ago. I could have also not burned that morning toast if only I set a timer instead of scrolling through Facebook standing by the toaster like a total knob. See my point? The better way, in my opinion is to discourage riding too fast which is the actual problem, not the failure to counter steer. The video both emphasizes don't ride like a knob, and if you do, counter steer is your friend and not your enemy. Don't look too deeply into the video or the content of it. It shows how a bad situation was made worse and what happens when our instincts (not counter steering) leads to a tipping point where a recoverable situation becomes not-recoverable.

Graphic? Yes, definitely.
Necessary to see? Yes, definitely.

The only other way I might ever see this happening is when it happens to me and I'm slamming into the truck. I don't go scour youtube for crash videos, why would I desire to watch people crash? But people putting it in my face, like this, forces me to acknowledge the problem. And now I consider myself education. Now I know a real-world example and my brain just might, if I'm lucky, say, "Hey I think I saw this on YouTube once..."
 

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So the conflict here between Gary and 01-7700 is Gary fights from the "How" perspective which is a valid side, and 01-7700 is highlighting from the "Why" perspective. Also a valid teaching angle.

The safety class taught me all about counter-steering. Frankly I went through the whole class wondering why I should give a **** about it, seemed logical just not that life-changing. They never showed me videos of a guy slamming into a truck though. That would have reinforced the point quite well from both perspectives showing me HOW to do it properly, and then telling me WHY I needed to have it down to a science and first instinct when steering my bike.

Glomping around the safety course parking lot dodging traffic cones using counter-steering didn't really sell me on the importance of it.
 

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Those dang FZ owners, always hotdogging their motorbikes...

I firmly believe that anyone who wants to throw a leg over should be watching crash videos relatively regularly. Not to a morbid degree, but enough to try and see mistakes that others have made and to try to learn from them. This rider actually got lucky because he reached for a handful of brake in the turn and missed... and if he would have successfully gotten it he would have gone straight under the tire instead of into the headlight.

Every time you throw a leg over you are making a conscious decision to forego the increased safety of a cage. How you mitigate that risk can be increased dramatically by watching how others have failed. Maybe a trigger warning would be appropriate but I think that trying to censor or ignore it would do a disservice to those that haven't fully/knowingly come to respect the inherent danger of the motorcycling lifestyle.

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Those dang FZ owners, always hotdogging their motorbikes...

I firmly believe that anyone who wants to throw a leg over should be watching crash videos relatively regularly. Not to a morbid degree, but enough to try and see mistakes that others have made and to try to learn from them. This rider actually got lucky because he reached for a handful of brake in the turn and missed... and if he would have successfully gotten it he would have gone straight under the tire instead of into the headlight.

Every time you throw a leg over you are making a conscious decision to forego the increased safety of a cage. How you mitigate that risk can be increased dramatically by watching how others have failed. Maybe a trigger warning would be appropriate but I think that trying to censor or ignore it would do a disservice to those that haven't fully/knowingly come to respect the inherent danger of the motorcycling lifestyle.

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This ^

Every once in a while I do watch youtube videos of crashes. Not because I get some kind of sick satisfaction, but because I need a reminder every now and then that I'm not invincible and regardless of riding technique there's external events that can't be controlled but can be avoided if you stay aware of your riding habits.

As mentioned earlier, yes counter steering could have avoided this, but the real issue was taking a curve too fast that you couldn't see the oncoming traffic till the bend.
 

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counter steering

I remember many years ago trying to convince people I worked with about counter steering. Telling them that to turn right it is necessary to push on the right bar, in other words turn the handlebar left, some of them were motor cyclists by the way.


Anyway, the outcome was that they thought I was nuts! Nobody believed me? And I mean nobody. This was around 1960! For people used to cars it really is a bit hard to grasp
 

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I remember many years ago trying to convince people I worked with about counter steering. Telling them that to turn right it is necessary to push on the right bar, in other words turn the handlebar left, some of them were motor cyclists by the way.


Anyway, the outcome was that they thought I was nuts! Nobody believed me? And I mean nobody. This was around 1960! For people used to cars it really is a bit hard to grasp
I've been riding for 40 years and didn't know how that worked until a few years ago.
 

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The problem with counter steering is that the explanations only go half way. It is a two part action. It is a fact that to turn left you MUST turn the front wheel to the left. This why most people are confused by counter steering, The initial action is to turn the bars to the right which moves the wheels to the right moving the tires out from under the centre of gravity of the machine causing it to lean left. Now, if this all a rider did he/she would fall down and hurt themselves.;-)


The secondary action is what is left out of the explanation of counter steering. Once the bike is leaned the rider MUST turn the bars in the direction of the turn to "catch" the bike and prevent it from "falling" over. In other words, the rider keeps the bike in equilibrium by keeping the tires more or less under the centre of gravity as needed.


Fortunately for us riders there are lots of forces that make this more or less automatic, gyroscopic forces being one of them.


I'm sure someone with a more scientific background than me can elaborate on this.
 
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