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Discussion Starter #1
What's up guys and gals? I recently began a YouTube motovlog called 'Moto Noir' and I thought I'd share a video I made about chain maintenance on the 2017 Honda Rebel...well, at least how I have to get it done in Brooklyn. I hope you find this video useful, at the very least, entertaining. Shamelessly plugging myself?... :smile2: ...naww, it's perfect for this forum!

I've learned so much from reading this forum and I'm so happy it exists! Big 'thank you' to all of you...

 

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A few tips and pointers, if I may:
- Cardboard. When using such a spray bottle as you do, you should cover the tire/rim with a piece of cardboard, so that you don't get keroseneall over the place where you don't want it. Possibly place some under the bike as well, as the kerosene and lube tends to drip a bit.
- Chain oiler. AKA GreaseNinja. This little thingy is quite genius, because it makes sure that you only apply the chain lube where you actually need it. Because it's only the O-rings that needs lubing, not the whole darn chain as many believes.

Hope this may help in the future, happy cleaning!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
A few tips and pointers, if I may:
- Cardboard. When using such a spray bottle as you do, you should cover the tire/rim with a piece of cardboard, so that you don't get keroseneall over the place where you don't want it. Possibly place some under the bike as well, as the kerosene and lube tends to drip a bit.
- Chain oiler. AKA GreaseNinja. This little thingy is quite genius, because it makes sure that you only apply the chain lube where you actually need it. Because it's only the O-rings that needs lubing, not the whole darn chain as many believes.

Hope this may help in the future, happy cleaning!
Awesome! Thanks for the pointers!
 

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....Because it's only the O-rings that needs lubing, not the whole darn chain as many believes...........
It's actually the O-rings and the rollers and the inner side plates (reduce wear over the sprockets), and the lube on the outside of the side plates helps prevent crud sticking to the chain and reduces corrosion.

I remember the good old days where you would remove the chain, wash it in a basin of kerosine and then boil it in a can of chain lube (usually on the kitchen stove, much to the annoyance of you know who).

You then lifted the hot chain out of the liquid and hung it up to drain. When it was cool you put it back on the bike. Messiest part of motorcycling in the old days.
 

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It's actually the O-rings and the rollers and the inner side plates (reduce wear over the sprockets), and the lube on the outside of the side plates helps prevent crud sticking to the chain and reduces corrosion.

I remember the good old days where you would remove the chain, wash it in a basin of kerosine and then boil it in a can of chain lube (usually on the kitchen stove, much to the annoyance of you know who).

You then lifted the hot chain out of the liquid and hung it up to drain. When it was cool you put it back on the bike. Messiest part of motorcycling in the old days.
Jim,

I can remember those days.

Kenny G
 

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It's actually the O-rings and the rollers and the inner side plates (reduce wear over the sprockets), and the lube on the outside of the side plates helps prevent crud sticking to the chain and reduces corrosion.
By all means, there is no such things as lubing a chain too much. It doesn't hurt in any way. With that said, what I was getting at was that it's mainly the o-rings that actually _need's_ the lube (and I kinda forgot about the rollers in the heat of the moment) So by all means, lube it to your hearts content :p
 

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I looked in the service manual for the cmx500 and they made it sound like not to use kerosene or petroleum products to clean the chain but a lot of videos show kerosene with o-ring chains so I guess its ok... I thought the book recommended the Pro Honda stuff...
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01J1QTVT4/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

some people like the molly and some like the wax type for the lube - I think it depends on the environment...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Here is the part from the service manual ....
Kerosene is much less volatile than gasoline and is a great degreaser. You want to wash it off after you're done scrubbing, but otherwise you're golden with kerosene.

My Honda dealership suggests and uses kerosene. Revzilla suggests it. Motorcyclist Magazine suggests it. So don't fret over kerosene. However, if you're a smoker, then I'd suggest not smoking while working with kerosene.
 

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It's actually the O-rings and the rollers and the inner side plates (reduce wear over the sprockets), and the lube on the outside of the side plates helps prevent crud sticking to the chain and reduces corrosion.

I remember the good old days where you would remove the chain, wash it in a basin of kerosine and then boil it in a can of chain lube (usually on the kitchen stove, much to the annoyance of you know who).

You then lifted the hot chain out of the liquid and hung it up to drain. When it was cool you put it back on the bike. Messiest part of motorcycling in the old days.
Good old days. :wink2:

As for my Rebel 500, I use kerosene too. Way cheaper that chain cleaner. Get the chain clean from muck and grease... finish by a layer of chain lube.
 

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Izani,

I use diesel fuel to clean motorcycle chains, it is not far off from kerosene and a whole lot less expensive.

I reached 4000 miles on the odometer and decided my chain needed it's first adjustment today. Honda's liberal use of thread locker made it very difficult to follow the service manual as the locknuts were locked fast to the adjustment bolt. I ended up using a 3 ft. long breaker bar on the 17mm locknut to break it loose.

Incidentally the axle nut takes a a 24mm socket, 6 point socket is best, an SAE 15/16 socket can be substituted for the 24mm socket. Torque to 88Nm or 65 Ft LB .

The locknut on the adjuster takes a 17mm socket, again 6 point is best. Torque to 21Nm or 15 Ft LB. I made my locknuts "Good N' Tight.....

The adjustment bolt takes a 5mm Allen Wrench...

I would suggest trying to break the locknut loose from the adjustment bolt before loosening the axle nut.

The amount of freeplay that you need on the chain is printed on the side of the chain guard. In the case of my U.S.A. Rebel 500 the freeplay is 1 1/4".

Good Luck,

Kenny G
 

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I was using a Harbor Freight Wheel Cleaning Stand to clean and lubricate my chain every 500 miles, but it was a hassle to turn the wheel.

Either on here or another forum I found a posting where some one was using a scissors jack to lift the swing arm to spin the wheel. I used a big zip tie to lock the front brake and the scissors jack along with a spacer under the side stand and a prop under the rear brake pedal to stabilize the bike while I turned the rear wheel. I already owned the scissors jack which I had purchased from Amazon years ago.
https://www.amazon.com/Torin-Steel-Scissor-Jack-Capacity/dp/B004PX8BC2/ref=sr_1_4?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1527294768&sr=1-4&keywords=scissor+jack&dpID=41MKlmmw-0L&preST=_SX300_QL70_&dpSrc=srch
 

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Very good. I thought of those who do not have a welding station to build a crutch. Just wood, without specialized tools.
 
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