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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Yesterday I bought a swing arm stand which didn't work because it was too short and the stock muffler got in the way. So I returned the stand and the part guy at Honda suggested that I try a wheel roller. I ordered one from harbor freight for $22, should do the job.

https://www.harborfreight.com/motorcycle-wheel-cleaning-stand-98800.html

Their is also a demo video:


Aloha!
 

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Yesterday I bought a swing arm stand which didn't work because it was too short and the stock muffler got in the way. So I returned the stand and the part guy at Honda suggested that I try a wheel roller. I ordered one from harbor freight for $22, should do the job.

https://www.harborfreight.com/motorcycle-wheel-cleaning-stand-98800.html

Their is also a demo video:

https://youtu.be/xdb_4ob_2yU

Aloha!
I just got a stand as well but haven't tried it yet. Mind linking which stand you bought that was too short? If it's the same one looks like I'll need to start the refund process :smile2:
 

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Discussion Starter #4

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Had a trip to my dealership today, and asked about how it was in regards of using a stand for the Rebel. They said that there isn't really much options for it, but they did have a universial one, wich instead of using "hooks" on the stand, it had like L shaped pieces that would go underneat the frame, and as such lift it up. Both sides had a rod with springs on them, so that when you adjusted it to the frame and lifted it they woudn't move and holde the bike securely. Was pretty neat actually.

Looked kinda like the one in the picture.
 

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Yeah, that's the type you need to lift via the swingarms, though I don't know that it would work with the stock exhaust.

The kind with hooks are designed to lift via spools (I think that's what they're called) that you have to add to the rear wheel mounts.
 

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So I went ahead and canceled my order and went ahead and just used the scissor stand in my car to get the rear wheel up. Took no time at all and was very stable. Chain is cleaned and waxed!
 

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I have used my Harbor Freight Wheel Cleaning Stand for years on several different motorbikes and it works as advertised.

Years a go I built a simple gantry to lift either the front end or back end of a bike up to work on it and it works quite well.

One of the disadvantages of the Rebel's engine being part of the frame I am not too keen on some some of the common stands that would lift the bike from the center, which is the engine on a Rebel.

Picture of gantry.

Kenny G

IMG_0278.JPG
 

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I have used my Harbor Freight Wheel Cleaning Stand for years on several different motorbikes and it works as advertised.

Years a go I built a simple gantry to lift either the front end or back end of a bike up to work on it and it works quite well.

One of the disadvantages of the Rebel's engine being part of the frame I am not too keen on some some of the common stands that would lift the bike from the center, which is the engine on a Rebel.

Picture of gantry.

Kenny G

View attachment 2385
That's patent looks rather interesting Kenny.
Could you perhaps show a picture of it when in use, to demonstrate how it works?
Might just build my own here, have been thinking about a solution such as this to make things more easy.
 

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Lyoko,

The next time that I have a motorbike to work on I will use the gantry and take a picture.

The winch is a boat winch from amazon and I pit a lifting strap wrapped around the handlebars to lift the front end. I am not sure where to pickup the Rebel to work on the back wheel.

After I have the motorbike lifted high enough to work on it I stack some lumber under the engine to steady the bike, and pound a wedge under the back wheel while I wrench on it. You need to clamp the cross brace to the gantry before you lift the bike to make the gantry stay in place while you are working.

I can't figure out how to attach an image of the gantry in use.

Kenny G
 

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I have used my Harbor Freight Wheel Cleaning Stand for years on several different motorbikes and it works as advertised.

Years a go I built a simple gantry to lift either the front end or back end of a bike up to work on it and it works quite well.

One of the disadvantages of the Rebel's engine being part of the frame I am not too keen on some some of the common stands that would lift the bike from the center, which is the engine on a Rebel.

Picture of gantry.

Kenny G

View attachment 2385
The Engine with no lower frame really pissed me off. The plates underneath clearly look like they were meant to be used to lift the bike. But when I contacted honda they told me they do not recommend lifting the bike this way. This actually makes it pretty impossible to lift the entire bike.
 

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Lyoko,

The next time that I have a motorbike to work on I will use the gantry and take a picture.

The winch is a boat winch from amazon and I pit a lifting strap wrapped around the handlebars to lift the front end. I am not sure where to pickup the Rebel to work on the back wheel.

After I have the motorbike lifted high enough to work on it I stack some lumber under the engine to steady the bike, and pound a wedge under the back wheel while I wrench on it. You need to clamp the cross brace to the gantry before you lift the bike to make the gantry stay in place while you are working.

I can't figure out how to attach an image of the gantry in use.

Kenny G
Ah, yes I get what you're on about from the picture you added.
That's actually rather bigger than I imagined it, I thought you only winched up the front by the tyre, and not the handlebar.
But that looks pretty good.
A neat and easy way to get the bike of the ground.
Thank you Kenny G!
 

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Lyoko,

You are be able to remove the front wheel by lifting the bike by the handlebars or triple tree. To lift the back end you have to be able to get under the upper frame somewhere to lift it, to remove the back wheel. You probably see the safety strap tied across the top of the gantry, and it is important to stack some lumber under the pegs to steady the bike.

Some of the stands that grab the swing arm, or fit into the triple tree, are probably a lot faster to lift the bike, but this didn't cost $20.00 to build and it does the job.

Kenny G
 

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While we are on the subject of chains; how often should we lubricate the chain when riding in normal dry conditions?

Kenny G
 

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While we are on the subject of chains; how often should we lubricate the chain when riding in normal dry conditions?

Kenny G
With "everyday" normal riding throu out the year they say at least two times. That's kinda the minimum.
Talking about in general thou, I don't see any reason why the Rebel should be lubricatet more frequent than other bikes.
But! It really comes down to how, and where you're riding. Is it hot all year and very dry, then you need to lubricate more often, about 4-5 times perhaps.
And if you're finding yourself cruising in a lot of high speeds all the time, then that too will make you need to lubricate more often.

So there isn't really any directly right answer for it, since it all depends on several things.
So just keep an eye on the chain every now and then.
Is it dirty, then give it a good cleaning and lubricate it again.
 

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Paddock stands

I have an ABBA stand which picks up on the swing arm pivot points ( after removing small plastic covers)
Previously used it on a CB500F with same fittings.
Had to take off both footpegs which are only held on with split pins .
The stands are expensive but have had mine for years & used on all my bikes, just had to buy the right fitting for each bike.
Check out their website.
 

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While we are on the subject of chains; how often should we lubricate the chain when riding in normal dry conditions?

Kenny G
With spray lubricants, every 400-500 miles should work fine. No chain ever failed because of over lubrication.
 

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How often should that rear chain adjustment be done?

I'm on a 500 Rebel Abs. I was talking to a guy today that rides a yamaha fz 09, and he was saying that the chain needs to be tightened every other time after cleaning it...i notice there is a big axle nut, and a chain tightener/adjuster bolt on the end of the right swing arm. anyone have any experience with this or how tight to make it? This is my first moto and I already have almost 1400 miles on it....and i haven't tightened it yet :eek:...cleaned it 3x already with motul degreaser and road lube.
 

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I'm on a 500 Rebel Abs. I was talking to a guy today that rides a yamaha fz 09, and he was saying that the chain needs to be tightened every other time after cleaning it...i notice there is a big axle nut, and a chain tightener/adjuster bolt on the end of the right swing arm. anyone have any experience with this or how tight to make it? This is my first moto and I already have almost 1400 miles on it....and i haven't tightened it yet :eek:...cleaned it 3x already with motul degreaser and road lube.
I haven't needed to adjust mine yet, but the specs for how much slack the chain should have (and how to adjust it) are in the owner's manual.
 
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