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Discussion Starter #1
Just cleaned and oiled my chain for the 3rd time since I got the bike. Moving from a scooter to a motorcycle did require a few changes in maintenance habits, one of which is chain maintenance of course.

I feel like i finally reached the Zen point, with the following process & accessories:

1. Use a sticky chain lubricant every 1000km - applied as spray from a pressurized can
2. Use regular motor oil every 500km - apply with brush (stole my daughter's watercolors brush), and clean off with kitchen paper towels.

As I don't have a stand, I simply move the bike along, applying the lubricant to the accessible part of the chain.

The beauty of the method is that the sticky spray lubricant stays a bit longer and is a bit less "messy", so it is more durable. The motor oil is there to clean the chain so to speak - apply, then rub off carefully. Whatever stays will gradually be splashed away from the chain as i ride, taking with it dirt.

What are your thoughts?
 

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Motor oil for cleaning...?? No no no, use paraffin for cleaning, the chain will shine like it's new again, and it doesn't hurt the O-rings either.
The lube you're using should be fine. Can also use SA80/90 transmission oil to lube the chain.

Lubing is one thing, but getting the chain nice and clean is quite important too, before applying lube.
Take care that you get the inside of the chain cleaned too. Too many think they've cleaned really good when it's shining on the outer side, and then they've forgotten the other side of the chain, so then you've basically only cleaned it 50%.
 

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Look online for a "grunge brush" (its 3-sided bristles allow you to easily clean all four sides of your chain). They're under US$20 but, IMHO, well worth it. :wink2:
 

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@Lyoko-Code thanks for the tip. I know paraffin/kerosene are also good for that.

However, I did come across the motor/gear oil method in an Israeli bike forum, and the logic was that if your chain isn't dirty from off road, lubing with oil will also clean it, as the particles stick to the oil and are thrown away from the chain as you drive.

Have to say that rubbing off the oil with paper towels did remove some of the external crap off the chain.

What's your chain maintenance process? I'd be happy to learn from your experience

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It ain't only good for it, but it does a way better job at getting the chain clean compeired to alot of products out there that is ment for cleaning, and at a waaaay cheaper price!

That logic sounds flawed... When cleaning the chain, it's not just old lube that'll be dirty on there, the dirt will "grow" stuck on the chain itself, so just "pouring" some oil on it and hoping it'll dissapair on it's own when driving is wishfull thinking. You'll have to get in there, get nice and dirty, to actually get the chain cleaned, rather than just "dusting" it a little.

What I've done thus far: Put a jack under the exhaust, and just lift it enough so that the tire comes off the ground, makes things way easy on yourself. No absolutt need, ofc, but convinient.
Some say to not clean/lube the chain when cleaning the bike itself, but I've slightly ignored that. When I'm first gonna get drity cleaning the bike, then the whole bike's gonna get's a cleaning in one go.
Clean the bike first, so you don't end up washing away some of the lube.
I went to a local shop that has bits of everything, and got the paraffin there, some fluffy towels that I folded and sewed so that I can use it as a "glove" of sorts, soak the towel, and start rubbing that chain. If it's really dirty, then go over the chain first with a brush, the one janesdaddy mentions is a good alternative.
When you've gone over the whole chain just simply lube it up again.
You could use a "towel glove" for this too, so that you'll apply what you need, and the excess will be wiped away at the same time.
Don't drown it when you lube it thou, you'll end up with it getting all over the place, and you don't want that..
So not too little, but not too much either.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sounds like a good solid method. As I'm still learning I'm very happy to try it out. What kind of jack are you using? Got a pic of it perhaps?

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Ok, reading the aforementioned thread about chain maintenance in the Israeli bike forum, the logic is different than I explained.

The wisdom there is that motor/gear oil contain cleaning materials anyhow, so instead of using kerosene to clean and oil to lubricate you can use oil for both, thus "saving" an extra step of drying off the chain before lubricating it.

There's some faffing and disagreement about using diesel vs kerosene and should you clean and then lube or just lube.

It is also mentioned that automatic gear oil can be used as cleaner.

I'm going to try and get my hands on a jack, I already have a brush, and try the "use oil for both" method first, and if it doesn't give good results get some kerosene for cleaning

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I have a 3-sided brush, a can of degreaser and a can of lube I'll be putting to use when my stands arrive next week. I can't recall the brand of degreaser/lube off the top of my head, but I can check and post back if anyone's interested.

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Where I ride there is little or no dust. My chain doesn't appear to be dirty at 500 miles, I do have a Grunge Brush, but so far it doesn't appear to be necessary to use it.

I use a clean cloth saturated with Kerosene and wash the sides of the chain off while turning the wheel in my Harbor Freight Wheel Cleaning Stand. I have been using the Honda Brand Chain Lube Spray Can and saturating the chain. The solvent in the lube appears to carry away some dirt with it. I have about 1500 miles on my Rebel 500.

I had a Honda VLX that I cleaned and lubed the chain as above and clocked 15,000 miles on a chain and never had to replace it or the sprockets. I used the procedure above with the exception that I used Dupont Wax Based Chain Lube.

https://www.amazon.com/DuPont-Wax-Based-Lubricant-aerosol-DCS614101/dp/B00HUYMPSO/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1505417616&sr=8-2&keywords=Dupont+Chain+Lube

I will be switching to the Wax Based Lube at some point.

Kenny G
 

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Sounds like a good solid method. As I'm still learning I'm very happy to try it out. What kind of jack are you using? Got a pic of it perhaps?

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I used a rather big 3 ton jack meant for cars. It was a little overkill...
But you can use just about anyone, just gotta be a little cautious on where and how you raise the bike, since the jack has to stand close to the tire.
 
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