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As mentioned in title, my '19 Rebel 500 is close to 4k miles and after washing today, I noticed that my chain was starting to slack up a bit to where I'd need to adjust it soon. I've already adjusted it once to get it within the green at 1 1/4" slack and if I do it again soon, it'll be in the red range for replacement. I understand that riding hard does wear the chain faster and I do accelerate hard sometimes (second gear off the line is just too fun) and I do a lot of highway riding, but is 4k miles a reasonable duration for a chain or am I missing part of the maintenance on it? I wash the bike about once a month or 500ish miles and clean/lube the chain at the same time with Maxima Chain Wax.

Thanks all, this is my first motorcycle so I'm all for learning a bit more about what I'm doing!
 

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Instead of 2nd gear off the line why not put a 15 tooth sprocket on the front? Much better all the way....
 

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I know this won't answer your question, but wouldn't 2nd gear accelerations wear out the clutch and/or sprocket and chain sooner? I was told by an avid biker once that it would 🤷‍♂️
 

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I understand that riding hard does wear the chain faster and I do accelerate hard sometimes (second gear off the line is just too fun) and I do a lot of highway riding, b

Thanks all, this is my first motorcycle so I'm all for learning a bit more about what I'm doing!
At least now you know what the cost of 2nd gear accelerations is.
 

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NO it wont wear out the chain/sprockets faster starting out in 2nd, I was just pointing out that a beginner usually doesnt ride like that.
AND WHY?!?!
Just trying to be different - or you like to rev your engine to get started from a stop? You can do that in first as well.
 

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Sorry. I thought this topic was on chain wear, not gear selection. I'm interested in the life of a chain. How many of you have had to replace a chain, and at how many miles? I have 6k miles (10k km) and my chain is in need of it's first adjustment.
 

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Sorry. I thought this topic was on chain wear, not gear selection. I'm interested in the life of a chain. How many of you have had to replace a chain, and at how many miles? I have 6k miles (10k km) and my chain is in need of it's first adjustment.
I'm right behind you on mileage, and chain slack is just over the 35mm mark, so will also need adjustment at the start of next riding season.
 

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Hey, chaps, did anybody take consideration that oem chains could be crap out from factory? Mine was first registered in Slovenia, and rode her with some 50 miles on odo and chain already developed few stiff links. It barely holds to 20kkms.
New one, I don't even know it exists, didn't even needs adjustment in following 20kkms... And I am lazy maintenance- cleaning wise otherwise😟
 

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As mentioned in title, my '19 Rebel 500 is close to 4k miles and after washing today, I noticed that my chain was starting to slack up a bit to where I'd need to adjust it soon. I've already adjusted it once to get it within the green at 1 1/4" slack and if I do it again soon, it'll be in the red range for replacement. I understand that riding hard does wear the chain faster and I do accelerate hard sometimes (second gear off the line is just too fun) and I do a lot of highway riding, but is 4k miles a reasonable duration for a chain or am I missing part of the maintenance on it? I wash the bike about once a month or 500ish miles and clean/lube the chain at the same time with Maxima Chain Wax.

Thanks all, this is my first motorcycle so I'm all for learning a bit more about what I'm doing!
You are susposed to lube and ajust the chain periodically... Regular motorcycle maintenance is part of your responsibility. Have you read the owners manual yet ? There is a ton of information and instructions in that.. Read it.. It will help you be a better rider and your motorcycle investment last longer
 

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You are susposed to lube and ajust the chain periodically... Regular motorcycle maintenance is part of your responsibility. Have you read the owners manual yet ? There is a ton of information and instructions in that.. Read it.. It will help you be a better rider and your motorcycle investment last longer
Looks to me like Alex has already read the manual: he knows to lube the chain regularly and he knows how to adjust the chain. Looks like he doesn't need a lecture on manual reading.
 

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I've travelled more than 5,000 miles since I last needed to adjust my chain and it's nowhere near needing another adjustment - and I don't even keep it lubed as often as I'd like.
I lubed it last week after giving the bike an extended hosing to get rid of caked on cow slurry off the underside of the bike and underneath the mudguards, but it had been more than 600 miles since my chain last saw just 10 minutes of chain maintenance ( which is all it takes).

Something somewhere is not quite right if chain replacement is being considered at such a low mileage.

That measurement in the handbook for chain slack is for adjusting the chain at it's tightest point when the rear suspension is at factory settings. If the adjusting ring is moved to increase preload then the swinging arm will sit further away from the 'horizontal' (minimum slack) position and noticeably more slack will be required to prevent the chain from being stretched every time the bike goes over a bump.
What should be done to counter this anomaly if you don't want to keep adjusting the suspension every time is to adjust the chain on the factory setting, then reset the preload to the desired position without moving the chain away from the tight spot and take a new minimum slack measurement. Chain slack is measured by lifting the lower rung until such a time as the upper one is seen to move.
Your new parameters for correct adjustment will be that measurement figure for your minimum slack plus 10mm for your maximum slack.

Riding with the sprockets/rear wheel out of alignment rear wheel will also severely shorten chain life. If your chain is running hard against either the inside or the outside face of the rear sprocket so one side is covered in lube and grit and the teeth are being worn away by the inner chain plate and the other side of the sprocket is clean and untouched - it's well over the permitted limit to ensure a long chain life and the rear wheel should be re-positioned into better/correct alignment.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I've travelled more than 5,000 miles since I last needed to adjust my chain and it's nowhere near needing another adjustment - and I don't even keep it lubed as often as I'd like.
I lubed it last week after giving the bike an extended hosing to get rid of caked on cow slurry off the underside of the bike and underneath the mudguards, but it had been more than 600 miles since my chain last saw just 10 minutes of chain maintenance ( which is all it takes).

Something somewhere is not quite right if chain replacement is being considered at such a low mileage.

That measurement in the handbook for chain slack is for adjusting the chain at it's tightest point when the rear suspension is at factory settings. If the adjusting ring is moved to increase preload then the swinging arm will sit further away from the 'horizontal' (minimum slack) position and noticeably more slack will be required to prevent the chain from being stretched every time the bike goes over a bump.
What should be done to counter this anomaly if you don't want to keep adjusting the suspension every time is to adjust the chain on the factory setting, then reset the preload to the desired position without moving the chain away from the tight spot and take a new minimum slack measurement. Chain slack is measured by lifting the lower rung until such a time as the upper one is seen to move.
Your new parameters for correct adjustment will be that measurement figure for your minimum slack plus 10mm for your maximum slack.

Riding with the sprockets/rear wheel out of alignment rear wheel will also severely shorten chain life. If your chain is running hard against either the inside or the outside face of the rear sprocket so one side is covered in lube and grit and the teeth are being worn away by the inner chain plate and the other side of the sprocket is clean and untouched - it's well over the permitted limit to ensure a long chain life and the rear wheel should be re-positioned into better/correct alignment.
Interesting, I was under the impression of keeping
I've travelled more than 5,000 miles since I last needed to adjust my chain and it's nowhere near needing another adjustment - and I don't even keep it lubed as often as I'd like.
I lubed it last week after giving the bike an extended hosing to get rid of caked on cow slurry off the underside of the bike and underneath the mudguards, but it had been more than 600 miles since my chain last saw just 10 minutes of chain maintenance ( which is all it takes).

Something somewhere is not quite right if chain replacement is being considered at such a low mileage.

That measurement in the handbook for chain slack is for adjusting the chain at it's tightest point when the rear suspension is at factory settings. If the adjusting ring is moved to increase preload then the swinging arm will sit further away from the 'horizontal' (minimum slack) position and noticeably more slack will be required to prevent the chain from being stretched every time the bike goes over a bump.
What should be done to counter this anomaly if you don't want to keep adjusting the suspension every time is to adjust the chain on the factory setting, then reset the preload to the desired position without moving the chain away from the tight spot and take a new minimum slack measurement. Chain slack is measured by lifting the lower rung until such a time as the upper one is seen to move.
Your new parameters for correct adjustment will be that measurement figure for your minimum slack plus 10mm for your maximum slack.

Riding with the sprockets/rear wheel out of alignment rear wheel will also severely shorten chain life. If your chain is running hard against either the inside or the outside face of the rear sprocket so one side is covered in lube and grit and the teeth are being worn away by the inner chain plate and the other side of the sprocket is clean and untouched - it's well over the permitted limit to ensure a long chain life and the rear wheel should be re-positioned into better/correct alignment.
Okay, I see. Back off the adjustment nuts and tighten back within my slack limits, then consider unusual chain wear or replacement. As it stands now, tightening it will bring it into the red but I can see about slacking it and resetting it completely next time I have the bike lifted or when I notice the slack out of limits.

I appreciate the actual reply, Im an aircraft mechanic and will do what I can to find an answer before asking a question, but I have no shame asking. Clearly some people thought I was asking for their impression of me as a rider :rolleyes:
 

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Often it's quicker criticise than to help!

You could always reposition the sticky label so the wear indicator is back inside the green zone ;) In all seriousness having a chain wear stuck on the swinging arm is all well and good providing it was positioned correctly in the factory and can therefore be relied upon. But if (as in the majority of bikes on the market) there was no sticker present you would have to measure chain wear to satisfy the need for replacement.

Permissible wear on an O ring chain is often given as 1%, although it's 2% for non O ring chains. Our 520 chain link pins have 15.875mm centres, so for 19 of them a measurement of 305mm would indicate the need for replacement.

If you don't have access to a 10-20kg weight to hang off the top chain run, one method is to ball up a soft rag and place it between the chain and rear sprocket, roll the bike forward trapping the rag between the two and this will remove all the slack from the lower chain run, then lock the front brake on so the bike doesn't roll backwards and then you can check/measure the (easier to access) lower chain run.
 

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OK its just chain slack.
The chain not going to fail or slip off if the adjustment is a bit larger.
One MM is a very small amount!
AND too tight is no good so don't do that.
 
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