Honda Rebel 300 & 500 Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
715 Posts
Hi all,
I just bought a used 2017 Rebel 300 the other day. I already own a 2009 Rebel 250 (which I am planning on keeping!). I am happy to see there are so many others as enthusiastic about their bikes as I am.
Anxious to hear how the two bikes compare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Hi LB Gary & all ... funny you should mention how the 2 bikes compare. I rode both today back to back and took some mental notes about my observations. If I need to move this thread to another forum, please advise, but here goes ...

PROS ON THE 300:
Very peppy, no problem jumping into traffic and accelerating to the speed of traffic flow
Had it up to 62mph on a back road this afternoon with room in the throttle to go faster - and it felt quite smooth
LOVE having a gas gauge and digital speedometer
The 6 speed tranny definitely gives a little more flexibility in tempering speeds on the roadway

CONS ON THE 300:
Due to the exhaust placement, I could feel the heat coming off of it, which I'm not used to, and not a fan of
I don't know if this is common, but the throttle has some play in it, so I have to rev it up a bit to pull out in 1st gear
To access the tool kit/storage, you have to remove the seat
Ignition is on the side of the bike (this is a minor thing, and just a personal preference I suppose)

PROS ON THE 250:
Lower "dual" exhaust means I don't feel the heat of the bike near my legs
Tight throttle, immediate response when I accelerate
Absolutely great at tight turns
Tool kit is easily accessible and lockable as it's not covered by the engine
Ignition is right under the speedometer, making it less likely you'll forget to take your key out of it
It is a very low bike, and being very short, I am able to be flat footed when stopped. This helped me build my confidence

CONS ON THE 250:
I've only had her up to 65mph, and I still had some room to accelerate more, but I'm a small lightweight person, and the bike is small. With that said, I didn't like the feeling that I was going to fly off of it as the bike does get "buzzy" around this speed
No gas gauge (legendary to the Rebel up until 2017) means watching the odometer - however there is a reserve tank which is easily accessible while driving

This is what I got for "day 1" of taking out the bikes. I'm sure I'll discover other things as I continue to ride them both.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
527 Posts
CONS ON THE 300:
Due to the exhaust placement, I could feel the heat coming off of it, which I'm not used to, and not a fan of
I don't know if this is common, but the throttle has some play in it, so I have to rev it up a bit to pull out in 1st gear
.
Mine had some slack on the throttle as well when I bought it new. When I took it in for the first oil change and service they went through everything and adjusted the throttle and clutch pull for me. No more play in the throttle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the tip! I am planning on getting the first maintenance done in a couple of weeks and I will mention it to them. Can someone point me in the right direction as to which forum I need to go to to ask about handlebar mods? Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Very nice and good analysis of the both bikes!

So you have inspired me, to do the same with my new rebel 500 and my former rebel 450 that I had given away 2007:

Engine
450: for full power you had to open the throttle very wide. It was more designed for high rpm`s. And it was only air cooled.
500: more power as on the 450 comes out at lower throttle.

Gears:
On the 450 the 6th was an overdrive.
500: I think, the 6th is a 6th, but no overdrive.

Minor maintainings:
500: I think, but have no experience yet, without proper facilities and workspace, you cannot do very much yourself- all electronics.
450: I had done jobs like adjusting carburretors, changing oil, build in a new choke- system, repairing the trottle, and so on.

Aftermarket gadgets:
500: there are a lot of them and there will be more in the future, I think.
450: I had found no items except a temp-gauge for oil-temp. No saddlebag - holders i.g.; I had to construct them for myself and to give the job to a metal-workshop. Or a windshield: there where not any of them around, so I used a home-made one.

Riding:
500: a lot more sporty as the 450, although it is designed as a bobber/custom. Handling in bends more aktive.
450: more the classic chopper as the 500. It had the footpegs nearly aligned to the front of the engine.

Gauges/Controls:
500: all digital, incl. a clock and a gas-gauge and 2 trip-meters.
450: all analog, without a clock and without a gas- meter (instead you had to estimate your gas consumption with the day-trip gauge and turn on your reserve-**** right in time)
450: had a switch to turn the lights on/off.
500: no switch for that. The lights are always on (it´s the law in european (EU) countries on new bikes, so you must not have switches anymore.)
450: turn signals where only turn signals.
500: they are also emergency signals and the front signals are the half of their power always on.

Safety:
450: rear brake was only a drum brake and no ABS at all.
500: we all know what there is, instead.

Cleaning/ Nursing:
500: an easy job. All black, some cleaner and water, and case closed.
450: a huge chrome job! All was chromed, handlebar, levers, the 2 exhausts, air filter housing, battery housing, turn signals, headlight, chain guard, rear shock absorbers and the engine guard I used on it.

a liitte personal summary:
The 500 maybe is an evolution of the 450, a bit stronger, a bit more agile, a bit shorter (5 cm in lenght), it looks also more puristic and not so baroque- styled as the 450. Maybe she is the bird after the dinosaur?
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top