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anybody rigg up a manual switch to radiator-to turn on manually in hot traffic-
no...my fan comes on when it reaches the temp Honda determined necessary for additional coolant/engine cooling
 
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It's always been a problem keeping the radiator small and fan off as much as possible on big cruisers. Some bikes have fans that don't come on until 230F because they'd never shut off if they came on earlier. It's claimed that the cylinder fins on the newest Triumph twins aren't just for looks.
 

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I have been out several times this summer with temps over 105 degrees on my 1100 DCT. I often look for the overheating idiot light to come on but it hasn't. I have stopped worrying about it My FZ09 had a temp readout. I always worried when I saw 220 or more but after a few years I stopped worrying about it too. My wife's 2016 Prius does not have a temp gage and I never worried about it. My 1988 Honda Hawk I have ridden in 108 degrees and temp guage has a needle but only H & L marks. I put a fan switch on it and have used it. It has never boiled over.

Worry, If you wish.
 

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It's nice to have a manual switch when the stock fan switch fails. I would consider doing it if it fails more than once. I went thru 2 OEM switches in less than 12,000 miles on my Helix. It was the only thing that ever failed on the bike. PITA to replace so I just rode when it was cool out and avoided traffic until I had a chance to replace it. I would've run a manual switch after the 2nd failure but sold the bike instead. Other LC bikes I've owned never had the switch fail but I know others that have constant failures and adding a manual switch was their best option.
 

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I believe the bike makers have designed the whole cooling system to work and NOT overheat even in west Texas temps.
You could also go the route that you need an extra water pump to back up the installed one,
Or maybe an extra battery for sudden battery failures,
or maybe carry a spare tire,
or - fill in the blank.

To cool of a engine isnt good either. I had a car that the thermostat stuck open something in the spring/summer.
Didnt find out until the late fall when I couldnt get any heat out to warm me up.
Used much less gas after I installed a working one.
 

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I believe the bike makers have designed the whole cooling system to work and NOT overheat even in west Texas temps.
You could also go the route that you need an extra water pump to back up the installed one,
Or maybe an extra battery for sudden battery failures,
or maybe carry a spare tire,
or - fill in the blank.

To cool of a engine isnt good either. I had a car that the thermostat stuck open something in the spring/summer.
Didnt find out until the late fall when I couldnt get any heat out to warm me up.
Used much less gas after I installed a working one.
How did you use less gas after installing a working thermostat?
 

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How did you use less gas after installing a working thermostat?
An engine running at the proper temperature will be more efficient. The ecu uses engine temp readings to adjust fuel delived to injectors.
 
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An engine running at the proper temperature will be more efficient. The ecu uses engine temp readings to adjust fuel delived to injectors.
Yep....as with the Ford Sierra Cosworth the engines were at their best/most efficient when running hot....much hotter than one would normally have expected. I am sure that the UK police bikes, which were all Pan Europeans for a while had to be split between BMW, Yamaha & Kawasaki because a fault in handling put all the Pans off the road. The Kawasaki bikes didn't do too well as they were burning out the water pumps because of high temperature, about the city/town use & slow escorting duties.
 

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You could also go the route that you need an extra water pump to back up the installed one,
Or maybe an extra battery for sudden battery failures, or maybe carry a spare tire,
or - fill in the blank.
Now you're just being silly! Those things are impractical to carry as a backup in case of failure but a manual switch could be pre-installed along side the OEM thermoswitch. What could you possibly do on the roadside with any of those parts you listed and how would you carry them around? What's wrong with having a manual switch if the stock one is known to fail?
 

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As I mentioned, my Honda switch failed twice and others have had failures. The Helix had a temperature guage so I knew when it was getting hot. In your case, you'd turn it on when the temperature warning light comes on. You can leave it on and not worry about overcooling since engine temperature is controlled by the thermostat. Or turn it off shortly after the light goes out. I wouldn't expect anyone to consider a manual switch unless they had one go bad so if you haven't experienced it, you wouldn't understand.
 

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The thermostat controls the temp by opening and closing controlling the flow of water through the radiator after a certain temp is reached. Once it is open the radiator controls the temp by allowing water (coolant) to flow through. The fan pulls air through it when the water gets to a temp that turns the fan on. The thermostat has been open for a long time before that happens. Once the engine has reached operating temp the thermostat will not close until the coolant gets below operating temp. Unless you are in some real cold weather, that will likely not happen until you shut the engine off and it sits allowing the coolant temp to go lower.
And while I may not have had this happen on my Rebel, I have experienced it.
Not to worry, I do understand.
 

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It's not like the thermostat pops open. It opens only as much as needed. If the radiator coolant is cold, it'll only let in a trickle of cold. If the radiator coolant is warm, it'll open a bit more. It won't open fully unless the radiator coolant is warm enough. That way, the coolant around the cylinders stays at a constant temperature even if it's below freezing.
 
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