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Discussion Starter #1
During this past summer’s riding I decided that a change of overall gearing on my 2020 CMX500 was needed. I had realized that when taking off from standstill in 1st gear at stop-signs or lights I usually needed to change up to 2nd too quickly. Taking off from 2nd also usually needed a bit of clutch slipping. So I decided upon raising the overall gear ratio a tad, via the gearbox chain sprocket. Stock is 15-tooth, and I found that 16-tooth versions are readily available, in straight steel and rubberized versions. I decided upon the rubberized version (sourced from the UK), which would give a 16/15 increase, or 6.7%. I managed to fit the new sprocket and do a short test ride before it got too chilly to ride, up here in Montreal. I was impressed with the change, which took only an hour to implement on the bike. The trickiest thing was the removal and refitting of the plastic chain sprocket cover ! The bike seemed slightly smoother and quieter, no doubt due to the rubberized sprocket, and the gearing change was just what I was looking for. No strange amber or red lights turned up on the dash, and the chain adjustment ended-up well within range at just 5mm forward on the rear axle. Since road speed (speedo) drive is taken from the gearbox, the speedo will read proportionately low, but this worries me not. Cruise speed rpm will be a little lower too. My source for the sprocket was Brooks Barn Motorcycles | eBay Stores in the UK, but there may be other providers in N/A.
33327
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It'll be proportional to the gearing ratio change 15:16.
In other words when the speedo display shows 75, I'll really be doing 80.
 

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Side note...want a correct speedo reading after a gear change?...this product is available for the Rebel to recalibrate the speedometer

SpeedoHealer LINK
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hmmm, yes, I saw that thing a couple of weeks ago, together with the other gadgets they market. But I don't think I'll go that far. If I ever need to have an unlikely SAAQ inspection done, I can just put the old sprocket back, which only has 1500km on it. On just about all the old Brit-bikes I had on the roads here over several years only a couple had working speedos, and probably would have failed an accuracy check anyways. I've never been a speed demon, and never really needed a speedo.
 

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I went up one tooth on the front and down 2 on the rear for my 2013 500X here in Thailand and it made the speedo accurate 😂
 
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