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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good news is I had a blast putting on those 8,000 miles.

Bad news ... where to begin? OK, let's start with shop rates of $160.00/ hour here in sunny Southern California.

Tires: "You've got about 3,000 to 4,000 miles left."
Chain: "It might make it to your next 8,000."
Sprocket: "Well, you probably will make it to your next 8,000 ... but you'll definitely have to replace it somewhere around then or soon after."

BTW and FWIW, I have every reason to believe the mechanic is a straight-shooter and is not trying to gouge me.

So beyond cursing that the Rebel isn't a shafty, I'm trying to figure out how to stay solvent.

1st thing that comes to mind is how to manage the cost of labor. I'm thinking that I may as well replace the chain with the tires as there will be negligible additional labor and that will offset any extra cost I'd incur if I had to pay for the labor after a little more life from the chain.

2nd thing is that if that occurs about 12,000 miles I can do nothing at 16,000 mile service interval other than the basic service.

3rd thing is that if I can nurse the sprockets to the 24,000 mile service ... another run of 12,000 on the tires and chain ... then I'd do it all at that time.

4th thing is ... as a serious aside ... why even bother to clean the chain? If it's barely going to make 12,000 miles, what the hell?

5th, no, I'm not mechanically inclined. I have great respect for those of you who can take on these things ... but that's not me.

Insights and advice, please.
 

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If you still have 3-4000 miles left after putting 8000 miles on your tires, then you certainly ride pretty easy so you should not have much wear on the chain unless you just don't oil it as stated in the manual. My rear tire sure won't go 3-4k more miles.

I have 8200 on my 1100 DCT. Still on the Original rear tire but it's close so maybe 8600 -8800 I will change it. The chain I log when I oiled it last on a white board. It usually gets dirt wiped off then spray oiled and wiped off again about every 3-400 miles. The chain is a little on the loose side but not over the max by any means, but it has never been adjusted since new. I expect my chain to last 24-30k. My FZ-09 with more power still had the original chain at 24000 and looked pretty good. I have a chain breaker and can do my own chain. It makes good sense to change the chain and sprockets when doing a tire change. I imagine it will be on my 3rd or 4th tire.

Tires I plan to buy rear first and front when it gets more worn. I remove the wheel and take the wheel and new tire to a shop and have them dismount and mount new tire. About 45.00 labor.

I did change the oil and both filters at 8000 miles. This was my second time (600 mile was first). I take my time and usually takes 2 hours counting some cleaning and bottling up the old oil. Even if it took me 6 hours I still saved money. The service manual pretty much tells you how to do things.

So, I save money that you say is out of the question. Ok, if you are not mechanically inclined, and have to pay for service, I suggest this. Each month put 100 or maybe 200 dollars into a jar. Do it religiously. Now when service is do, you have the funds to get it done with less pain on the month's budget. If it too you 6 months to get to 8000 miles and you need 800 dollars in maintenance the math says 100 will work.

Shop rates vary from one dealership to another so check around. Also, you can look online and see what genuine Honda parts cost and you can get a quote for those parts ahead of time by just asking the parts counter to see if they are padding that part of the bill.

I live in a small town and there are 2 independent cycle shops that can change a chain and do tires for less. If they have been in business for a few years, they probably can do the work ok. Any shop can be careless and bend a lightweight alloy wheel (even a dealer). I always spin a wheel on the bike with a straight edge close to the rim and know that my wheel is true and then do that afterwards. Easy to do.

Good luck.
 

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first congrats on recognising your limitations, some people that don't know which end of a screwdriver to use for a hammer still try to do their maintenance and end up spending way more to fix their "fixes".
Next, your mech did ok telling you you could wait, lots would have been happy to charge you to remove and replace good parts, then sold the used ones on ebay as used.
lastly, you don't have to be mechanically inclined to compare things, like if you had a picture of a worn to the limit sprocket and could compare yours to it , you could do that , same with chain, tIres is a funny thing, you are aware of the toilet paper roll thing and tires, I hope , and climate and road conditions etc make it unwise for one person in florida to tell a person in conneticut when to change his tires,
We kinda need some good reference pics here on chain wear and sprocket wear to do our comparin and maybe even some measurements with simple device for idjits like me , to look at. This site has smart guys wo can help with that , maybe we can get that info before you need it
 

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When I raced dirt bikes I never lubed my O-ring chain. Lube is sealed inside by O-rings. I only treated the chain with silicone spray to prevent rust.

I see / read they recommend oiling chains. Oil is sticky, dust and dirt stick to sticky. I am not convinced oiling an O-ring chain is a good idea. I am still pondering what I will do there when I get a bike with a chain.
 

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When I raced dirt bikes I never lubed my O-ring chain. Lube is sealed inside by O-rings. I only treated the chain with silicone spray to prevent rust.

I see / read they recommend oiling chains. Oil is sticky, dust and dirt stick to sticky. I am not convinced oiling an O-ring chain is a good idea. I am still pondering what I will do there when I get a bike with a chain.
agreed sprayin on sticky stuff causes stuff to stick, chain gets sticky stuff on it from the road, so cleaning the grit off it still has to be done even if lube not applied for lube purpose , I'm kinda on the fence about rust, in salty areas yeh it's gonna be a problem but even the 90 plus percent humidity here fails to penetrate road grime that keeps rust from occurring on a daily basis, I lube after cleaning the grime off to prevent rust, not to lube chain
 

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Understand your pain as I started riding again after many years gap and forgotten the maintenance/cost required. 15months later I have over 13K miles on the bike.

At first I was definitely afraid to touch the bike for maintenance thinking if I screw it up, it's my life. But I found great resources online with people posting how to maintain/repair a lot of items on the 1100. I started with the easy things first (like cleaning the chain) and now comfortable doing most fixes on the bike myself. There are many posters but the guy who does great videos for the 1100 is "On the Rebel 11" on youtube. His videos range from cleaning/tightening the chain to taking off tires. All very useful. Only you will know what mechanical fixes you are comfortable with but suggest trying the easy maintenance items.

On the chains/sprockets: what I can find on the web says these should last 20k-30K with care. Definitely suggest cleaning/waxing the chain every 600 miles as per manual. Doing this is really easy and my chain and sprockets look almost as good as when I first got the bike.
 

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When I raced dirt bikes I never lubed my O-ring chain. Lube is sealed inside by O-rings. I only treated the chain with silicone spray to prevent rust.

I see / read they recommend oiling chains. Oil is sticky, dust and dirt stick to sticky. I am not convinced oiling an O-ring chain is a good idea. I am still pondering what I will do there when I get a bike with a chain.
The factory lube that's sealed in is only between the pivoting pins and bushings. You still need to get lube in between the rollers and the bushings so they can spin freely. It's pretty common to have seized rollers on poorly maintained sealed chains and not notice but they add friction and accelerate sprocket wear since they end up sliding instead of rolling onto the teeth.
 

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The factory lube that's sealed in is only between the pivoting pins and bushings. You still need to get lube in between the rollers and the bushings so they can spin freely. It's pretty common to have seized rollers on poorly maintained sealed chains and not notice but they add friction and accelerate sprocket wear since they end up sliding instead of rolling onto the teeth.
"Contrary to what the name implies, the rollers don’t actually roll on the sprockets. Rather, they are the acting component that allows the chain to bend smoothly around the sprockets without creating any binding or breakage from shock."

This sounds like there is very little wear on the rollers.

I would take a belt drive conversion kit anytime if one could be fitted to the bike.
 

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I think the mechanic was OK in saying you can wait, but you can also wait until the chain and sprocket are wore to the point it REALLY needs to be replaced.
Sure the mechanic seemed to be honest, but they always go for the worst case setup and so even though you can go 20,000 miles or more, "suggests" you replace at 12,000 or 16,000 miles.
Should you? - no.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wow! What great responses (as usual).

Lot to sort through ... especially bill 'n oroville and janexta for referring "On The Rebel 11."

The mechanic actually let me stand beside and watch ... and explained what he was doing as he went along. One thing I wondered about. He used Maxima chain cleaner and then ran the chain through a micro cloth. The cloth came away with a healthy smear of dirty grease. I imagine they have an industrial service to clean those cloths ... but I don't know about my washing machine. Do you just have to discard them eventually?

I'm still thinking about getting a center stand for chain maintenance ... but I've been concerned that it's placement might drag on a lean before the pegs drag. A terrible thought. I looked at pictures for theT-Rex, but only could find ones with the stand down.

Can anyone here allay my anxiety?
 

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Wow! What great responses (as usual).

Lot to sort through ... especially bill 'n oroville and janexta for referring "On The Rebel 11."

The mechanic actually let me stand beside and watch ... and explained what he was doing as he went along. One thing I wondered about. He used Maxima chain cleaner and then ran the chain through a micro cloth. The cloth came away with a healthy smear of dirty grease. I imagine they have an industrial service to clean those cloths ... but I don't know about my washing machine. Do you just have to discard them eventually?

I'm still thinking about getting a center stand for chain maintenance ... but I've been concerned that it's placement might drag on a lean before the pegs drag. A terrible thought. I looked at pictures for theT-Rex, but only could find ones with the stand down.

Can anyone here allay my anxiety?
the t rex center stand is higher than the foot peg mounty thingy, i'll take some measurements and get back to you

hand wash towels in a bucket to remove most grease, then use washer when swmbo isn't home

toilet paper and tires, tires are like a roll of toilet paper, the closer to the end you get the faster it goes away
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
the t rex center stand is higher than the foot peg mounty thingy, i'll take some measurements and get back to you

hand wash towels in a bucket to remove most grease, then use washer when swmbo isn't home

toilet paper and tires, tires are like a roll of toilet paper, the closer to the end you get the faster it goes away
Thanks so much!
 

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Stock chain and sprockets are often junk. High dollar chain and sprockets can last at least 4 times longer. I put them on my Hawk GT after the stock ones wore out after about 10,000 miles. Never gave it a proper cleaning and it rarely needed adjusting. Sold it at 45,000 miles and it was still in good shape.
 

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Stock chain and sprockets are often junk. High dollar chain and sprockets can last at least 4 times longer. I put them on my Hawk GT after the stock ones wore out after about 10,000 miles. Never gave it a proper cleaning and it rarely needed adjusting. Sold it at 45,000 miles and it was still in good shape.
I have owned 7 Hawk GT's and the one I have I have owned for 7 years. I think in 1989 Honda had better quality especially on the Hawk GT, It was pricey when introduced in 1988. It's easy to see the Rebel 1100 does not have the quality the Hawk has but the 1100 is ok but Honda built it to hit a price point that made it a good buy. I changed the original chain on my Hawk at over 25,000 miles only because I got it for free with another Hawk I sold. It could have gone longer and I did not change the sprockets. Most popular name brand sprockets and chains tend to last well but I doubt 4 times longer.
 
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